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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Harvey: "The exciting day arrived and we [as under age school boys] snuck into the [pub's] rehearsal room, sat awkwardly to attention on hard chairs in a row facing the band and heard our first - very loud - live jazz. What an occasion that was - we even drank beer because we understood that's what jazz people did and that's what the band were drinking." - (Just Jazz June 2020)

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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Saturday, May 11, 2019

Keswick Jazz & Blues Festival: Barnes plays Hodges - May 10


Alan Barnes (alto sax); Richard Exall (tenor sax); Jamie Brownfield (trumpet); Ian Bateman (trombone); Brian Kellock (piano); Bruce Rollo (double bass); Tom Gordon (drums)
(Review by Russell)

Johnny Hodges, small group, early fifties, full house...not quite. The word was that some of Keswick Jazz and Blues Festival's patrons thought it dangerously modern and went off looking for a banjo. So, Southey St Church was busy but not bursting at the seams. The ubiquitous Alan Barnes led an all-star line-up in what would prove to be a wonderful celebration of Ellington's alto saxophonist affectionately known as 'Jeep' or 'Rabbit'. 


Those early fifties' years found Hodges doing what he did with Duke - playing blues and ballads, only during this period it was in a swinging small group scenario. Globetrotter for openers and for the next couple of hours Barnes and co played brilliantly with the band leader's inimitable, hilarious introductions and asides threading the whole thing together.  

Frisky - a cue for Barnes: Do you remember feeling like that? - featured Ian Bateman's classy trombone playing and Richard Exall's commanding tenor sax. Barnes introduced the rhythm section: A marvellous swinging drummer - Tom Gordon...and, playing fine walking lines - Bruce Rollo, and at the piano - the world class Brian Kellock. To AB's left, Jamie Brownfield. What a great trumpet player and, what's more, he's of the new generation. Barnes himself featured on Passion Flower, Exall featured with the rhythm section on In a Sentimental Mood (superb) and two hours later the Hodges' tribute went out cookin' on The Jeep is Jumpin' and Shady Side of the Street with not a banjo in sight.  
Russell 

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