Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Sting: "It was great. They [the River City Jazzmen] all wore blue suits. The band had been together for about twenty years, which was the same age as the suits." - (Melody Maker Sept. 22, 1979).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday October 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see centre column).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 3:00pm/5:30pm. Screening of Stanley Nelson's documentary film (2019, cert. 15, 1hr 55mins).

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, May 27, 2019

CD Review: The Last Taxi - New Destinations


Chiara Liuzzi (voice, electronics, sound objects), Giorgia Santoro (flute, bass flute, bansuri, xiao, piccolo, voice, effects), Adolfo La Volpe (guitar, live electronics), Giacomo Mongelli (drums), Chris Rathbun (bass), Pat Battstone (piano).
(Review by Steve T)

Ethnic sounding flute and female voice with something going on behind. I knew this was going to be a tricky review, with three out of six musicians playing electronics, sound objects, effects and live electronics, not to mention a couple of instruments I've never heard of. Anybody who would be interested in it will probably have already made up their minds.


Track two evolves into something resembling a jazz piano trio, then voice - and possibly some discernible lyrics - before some unusual guitar chords joined in, then flute.

Some breathing and sound-effects lead into another piano trio, plus more obscure, obtuse guitar chords, then joined by one of the flute family before it settles into a basic rock rhythm, giving the whole thing some welcome release.

Piano, heavy breathing, some effects, guitar but this time it's a long piece to sustain. And so it goes on though becoming increasingly difficult to maintain interest.

Until track ten of thirteen. Morning in a Japanese Garden   with some Far East Asian sounding instrumentation and vocalising, joined by some lovely, tasteful ivory tinkling bringing a contrasting Western flavour.

I'd love to say the album is better than my futile adjectives suggest but, if I'm honest, I suspect I'm making it sound better than it actually is. While there is a market for this type of thing, I doubt if anybody from the regular Bebop Spoken Here team are equipped to do it justice. Ann Alex claims she has been promoted to reviewing instrumental albums so perhaps I've been demoted to reviewing a vocal album, although I remain uncertain whether there are any recognisable words.

I don't dislike it and some of it's very good, and I'm not averse to interludes, provided they enhance the jouissance, here the best bits would work fine as interludes, but fall short as highlights.

I suspect it will be far more interesting live and I would certainly try to catch them if they played the North East, so perhaps that's where they could sell it.
Steve T 

No comments :

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance