Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Sting: "It was great. They [the River City Jazzmen] all wore blue suits. The band had been together for about twenty years, which was the same age as the suits." - (Melody Maker Sept. 22, 1979).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday October 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see centre column).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 3:00pm/5:30pm. Screening of Stanley Nelson's documentary film (2019, cert. 15, 1hr 55mins).

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, September 12, 2016

CD Review: Ryan Quigley – What Doesn’t Kill You

Ryan Quigley (trumpet), Paul Booth (tenor saxophone, alto flute), Steve Hamilton (piano, Fender Rhodes), Michael Janisch (double bass) & Clarence Penn (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Prologue introduces Ryan Quigley. A short solo trumpet feature, the quality immediately apparent. Recorded in July 2014, Quigley’s new album What Doesn’t Kill You boasts the finest of line-ups. Joining the band leader is Paul Booth, reeds, Steve Hamilton, piano and Fender Rhodes, record label boss Michael Janisch, double bass and the brilliant American drummer Clarence Penn.

Doctor Stage, all eight minutes and twenty seconds of it, sizzles from note one. Tenor, of the searing variety, sets a killer pace and Quigley responds in style driven along by a bass and drums engine room working overtime. Ten tracks, bookended by solo trumpet pieces (Prologue and Epilogue), total some fifty-six minutes. Quigley wrote all ten compositions with one exception – Janisch’s Intro to Hymn to Their Homeland. All of the tunes on this  Whirlwind Recordings’ CD exhibit strong melodies, a cohesive, collective sound, and the   assured improvisational flights one would associate with Quigley and his band mates.

A wistful, neo-classical Fire Eyes gives way to the title track; Steve Hamilton’s brooding Fender Rhodes with something of a NYC downtown feel to it, Paul Booth’s fully formed tenor playing featuring prominently. Quigley’s inspiration, or starting point, is, perhaps, a love of the hard bop canon and the later contemplative explorations of John Coltrane and others. Two superb tracks – The Long Journey Home and Hymn to Their Homeland – are cornerstones of the album: the former roaring out of Messengers’ territory with Clarence Penn in commanding form behind a trumpet/tenor joust, the latter hears considered keys  from Steve Hamilton.

Say What You See is a penultimate tune blow out. Fifties hard bop is given a contemporary reading, the icons of music (Kenny Dorham, Lee Morgan, Johnny Griffin, Benny Golson) would have welcomed as equals to the stage Messrs Quigley, Booth, Hamilton, Janisch and Penn.                    
Russell

What Doesn’t Kill You by Ryan Quigley is available now on Whirlwind Recordings (WR4691).

No comments :

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance