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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Puddy: "Eventually we paid our entrance money [to Eel Pie Island] and fought our way to one of the many bars where we could buy our Newcastle Brown and retire to the back of the heaving dancefloor. There must have been lights somewhere, but my memory remains of being in some dark cavernous wonderland." - (Just Jazz July 2020)

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11,612 (and counting) posts since we started blogging just over 12 years ago. 747 of them this year alone and, so far, 11 this month (July 3).

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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.
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Born This Day
Louis Armstrong and Steve Andrews.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

The After Hours Set

(Review by Russell)
The Tyneside Cinema’s retro chic café bar on Pilgrim Street stands opposite a neglected, decaying cinema of yesteryear. Once upon a time the Odeon Cinema opened its doors to the great touring bands from America: the Count Basie Orchestra graced the stage in the late fifties – the occasion captured on a vinyl release some years ago. Blues bands came through too: Chris Farlowe, Paul Butterfield and Eric Burdon.
All these years later Eric Burdon sat quietly in the ‘Tyneside’ listening to the jazz scene’s current practitioners. Perhaps Mr B had long since forgotten his appearance over the road way back when, he was here to remember Newcastle’s ‘Jazz Man’, Keith Crombie. Many of the musicians from the old place on Pink Lane paid musical tribute to the man (see the editor’s earlier review). The evening wore on, the band played on. James Harrison got up to play, allowing Pete Gilligan to stretch his legs. JH accompanied Lyndsay Hannon – an all too familiar role. And that was the theme of the night. The Findens joined Don Forbes, Stuart on bass (for the remainder of the night), and Fiona singing a fine version of I Fall in Love Too Easily.

Minnie Fraser sang a couple of tunes with PG at the keyboard once more. Listening to the Railway Street vocalist (the Jazz Co-op – Pink Lane connection continued) singing Four was a highlight among many. At around half past midnight an optimistic Ray Burns sang about being On the Sunny Side of the Street. To close, Gilligan and Hannon appropriately said goodnight to the hardy souls nursing a ‘last orders’ beer. Stepping out onto the street nigh on one in the morning, no one was handing out flyers. The changing jazz times.
The After Hours Set: Peter Gilligan (piano), James Harrison (piano), Don Forbes (trumpet), Stuart Finden (double bass), Lyndsay Hannon(vocals), Fiona Finden (vocals), Minnie Fraser (vocals) & Ray Burns (vocals & harmonica)
Russell.

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