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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Carrick: "I contacted Max Jones of Melody Maker and offered to be his correspondent in the States, but I should have done what Ken Colyer had done, get a job on a ship and then jump ship in the States. So I didn't make it [to New Orleans] till 1973." - (Just Jazz May 1999)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Sleuthing in the Jazz Age

(Preview by Russell).
Newcastle-based author Fiona Veitch Smith will be talking about, and reading from, her Poppy Denby Investigates series of ‘Jazz Age’ novels on Thursday, 22nd September and again on Monday of next week, 26 September. On Thursday Veitch Smith will be at the book launch of her second novel in the series – The Kill Fee – in Blackwell’s Bookshop, 141 Percy Street, Newcastle at 6:00pm. Meet the author and listen to some live jazz.
Next week the author will be at Newcastle City Library to talk about her debut novel The Jazz Files (shortlisted for the 2016 Crime Writers Association Historical Dagger Award) and authenticity in period crime fiction. Tickets are free for the event starting at 5:00pm. To book your place telephone 0191 277 4100
Russell.

2 comments :

Steven T said...

Coincidentally I'm reading a book set in 1919 New Orleans featuring a cast of characters including a 'chubby faced young horn-player on second cornet, who had not yet changed the pronunciation of his name to the French form Louey, and was still known...as Lil' Lewis Armstrong'.
It's called 'the Axe-mans Jazz' by Ray Celestin and I'm only a couple of chapters in, but so far so good.

Lance said...

See Pages/Book Reviews in left hand column. Ray Celestin has written a sequel published this month - Dead man's Blues.

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