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Bebop Spoken There

JD Allen: "...art in itself is now a luxury that you need a lot of finances to do." - (DownBeat October 2021)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.
Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST! --

Postage

13,806 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 1223 of them this year alone and, so far, 50 this month (Oct. 13).

From This Moment On ...

October

Sun 17: Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 17: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club. 1:00pm.
Sun 17: Shunyata Improvisation Group @ Unitarian Church, Newcastle. 1:30pm.
Sun 17: Vula Viel @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Mon 18: Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

Wed 20: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 20: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 20: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.
Wed 20: Jeremy McMurray & the Jazz Pocket Orchestra @ Middlesbrough Town Hall. 8:00pm.

Thu 21: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, North Tyneside. 1:00pm.
Thu 21: NUJO Jazz Jam @ Bar Loco, Newcastle. 7:00pm. Newcastle University Jazz Orchestra.
Thu 21: Alter Ego @ St James' & St Basil's Church, Newcastle 7:30pm.
Thu 21: Maine Street Jazzmen @ Sunniside Social Club, Gateshead. 8:30pm.
Thu 21: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman's Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm.

Fri 22: Mick Shoulder Quartet @ Lit & Phil, Newcastle. 1:00pm. Quartet featuring Alex Clarke (BBC Young Jazz Musician of the Year finalist).
Fri 22: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Fri 22: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm.
Fri 22: Paul Edis Trio w Ruth Lambert @ St Cuthbert's Centre, Crook. 7:30pm.
Fri 22: Michael Feinstein @ Sage Gateshead. 8:00pm.
Fri 22: Peter Morgan Trio @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Sat 23: Mary Coughlan @ Gosforth Civic Theatre, Newcastle. 8:00pm.
Sat 23: Têtes de Pois @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Sun 24 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 24: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club, Hartlepool. 1:00pm.
Sun 24: Voices of Virtue Gospel Choir @ The Globe, Newcastle. 4:00pm.
Sun 24: Milne Glendinning Band @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Saturday, October 13, 2012

You can’t play that music tonight, that music belongs to the morning!

(By Ann Alex).
And that restriction, jazzers, is one of the rules about playing Indian ragas, as I learned when attending the lecture about South Asian music, at the Sage on Tuesday this week, given by Prof. David Clarke of Newcastle University.  This was an interesting and fascinating illustrated talk.  I'll try to convey the information given, though I'm no expert.  Jazz musicians will identify with some of the ideas behind this form of music.
Prof. Clarke was discussing Northern Indian classical music, known as Hindustani music.  Rather than our formal written classical music, this is ‘mood’ music with a certain ‘feel’, hence the rule that certain pieces or ‘Ragas’ can only be played at certain times of the day.  The music is improvised within a set structure and most musicians are able to play about 100 ragas, although there are 1000s in existence.  The music isn't normally written down except for teaching purposes.  No two performances of the same raga will be identical.
First, the drone is set up, played on a 4 stringed instrument. We were told that this is played by stroking each string as you'd stroke a lover!  The drone plays throughout the piece and can be produced electronically.  Then comes the main instrument, often a sitar or the voice, and the raga is established by playing the relevant notes for that raga from the scale.  The note names are Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni.  After some time, possibly 5 or so minutes of playing, the two tabla drums begin repeating their pattern of 12 or 16 notes, called Thekas, as appropriate for the raga.  There is improvisation by the sitar and drums, although the drums have to be subtle.  The raga proceeds through the various sections, often ending with very fast tabla playing.  How do the musicians know when to begin a new section?  Prof Clarke said ‘They just know!’  This must sound familiar to jazz musicians.
If someone is singing the raga, the words are either religious or romantic, or sometimes both combined.  I recently heard a raga performance and the music reminded me of Western minimalist classical music, say that of Philip Glass, but more complex.  Apparently the ethos of ragas is in the background of lots of Indian music, including popular music.  I was fascinated by this talk which has demystified an unfamiliar type of music.  There is more information about performances at
Ann Alex.

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