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Tony Fisher: In the heyday of that scene [the1960s] there were about 120 musicians in London who did everything and of course, if you made a mistake you were never called again." - (Jazz Journal online, 19 September 2019).

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In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

CD REVIEW: All Upon A Lovely Summer’s Day: Burton Bradstock


Burton Bradstock aka Jimmy Cannon (vocals, arranger); Dorian Ford (piano); Iain Ballamy (saxophone); Julian Ferraretto (violin); Pete Berryman (guitar and co-arranger); Riaan Vosloo (bass); Tim Giles (drums); also various musicians playing strings
(Review by Ann Alex). 
This is an unusual CD of traditional folk songs played and sung in a jazz-like manner by very talented musicians who have excellent credentials and much experience.  My reaction, as a jazz-loving folkie, was mixed. 
I doubt if this would appeal to lovers of very traditional folk song, but jazz fans may like it better, as there is plenty of jazz involved.  As for folk, there are some very successful tracks, but some tracks veer too far towards classical music because the strings are overused, thus missing the gutsiness of real folk music.  The vocalist sings in a pleasantly slightly husky voice, which would have suited more gutsy, adventurous arrangements, moving away from the tune, maybe even with a bit of scat.  I think Iain Ballamy should have been used more – after all this instrument (saxophone) is starting to appear in folk clubs.
I did like The Foggy, Foggy Dew, one of the less complex arrangements, with a ragtime piano accompaniment and brushed drums percussion – very effective.  Then there was John Barleycorn (all about growing barley and making beer, but from the barleycorn’s point of view), a no-holds-barred modern jazz arrangement with a distinctly drunken sound.  All Things Are Quite Silent is a song about the press gang, and the tragic theme deserved more than just luscious playing by the strings.  Early One Morning was a missed opportunity, which needed a more lively singing style.
As I said, this is a group of skilled musicians, who should maybe try more folk song arrangements, with some instrumental only tracks, and a selection of songs such as Border Ballads, which can be done well as Blues.  I know this works, because some musicians from the Newcastle Folk Degree did this in a Sage concert last year. 
The CD -  All Upon A Lovely Summer’s Day: Burton Bradstock - is released on October 29th on the F-IRE label, catalogue number F-IRECD 58.  There is a CD launch at the Pizza Express Jazz Club, Soho on 30th October.
Ann Alex (Russell is nowhere in my name!)

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