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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Monday, October 22, 2012

Graeme Wilson Quartet @ The Central Bar, Gateshead. October 21


Graeme Wilson (tenor & baritone saxophones), Paul Edis (keyboards), Andy Champion (double bass) & Adam Sinclair (drums)
(Review by Russell - photos courtesy of Graeme Wilson and Cath.)
The Head of Steam’s Central Bar on Half Moon Lane in Gateshead stepped into the breach when Splinter’s regular session at the Bridge Hotel was inadvertently double booked. 
The new quartet was ready to go with a set list of Wilson’s tunes ranging  from established pieces to new charts. 

Wilson opened the set with a tune familiar to the Tyneside audience; Street of Furs featured in the pad of the now disbanded Voice of the North Jazz Orchestra and it worked well in this small group format. Pontoon formed part of a commission from the Harbour Association of Mull (I wonder…was it released on CD?) and bassist Andy Champion grabbed the first of several solo opportunities. 
Searchlight Nevada spun a tale of John Coltrane going missing in the desert; Wilson’s quartet didn't hide, they dug deep and found Coltrane. Trane was there all along at the core of the music. 
Offissa Pupp (a funk groove), New Wallaw (a Voice of the North commission) and Remara (also heard previously in big band or Splinter Group context) illustrated the breadth of Wilson’s talents as composer. The latter number featured Wilson’s excellent tenor and Paul Edis (keyboards). 
Sycamore (a lament and a second reference to the derelict Wallaw Cinema in Blyth) show-cased Wilson’s cool tenor playing and Edis’ measured response. A brace of new tunes - Toe of Fudge and Pleasureland – are sure to be heard again at future gigs (they’re good ones) and Honolulus (the final number of the evening) tore it up (cue Adam Sinclair’s top grade drum solo). 
Catch the Graeme Wilson Quartet at a gig sometime soon – they’re a seriously good outfit. Wilson has another project brewing…the music of John Coltrane. When Wilson puts it on the stand it will be with a slightly different but equally good line-up. A must for those who know Coltrane’s music. A must for those who know Wilson’s music. Keep checking Bebop Spoken Here for news of where and when.
Russell                     

1 comment :

John Burgess said...

Graeme's such a great tenor player, you're so lucky to have him in your neck of the woods. Always really loved his sound.

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