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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Carrick: "I contacted Max Jones of Melody Maker and offered to be his correspondent in the States, but I should have done what Ken Colyer had done, get a job on a ship and then jump ship in the States. So I didn't make it [to New Orleans] till 1973." - (Just Jazz May 1999)

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The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

John Law Trio @ King’s Hall, Newcastle. October 25

John Law (piano & keyboards), Yuri Goloubev (double bass) & Tim Giles (drums)
Pianist John Law returned to the King’s Hall to play a trio concert with bassist Yuri Goloubev and drummer Tim Giles. The lunchtime date drew a sizeable audience to hear the trio present a few numbers from Law’s recent CD release Three Leaps of the Gazelle together with one or two other tunes. The Nick Drake tune River Man opened the one set performance. The King’s Hall’s acoustics did little to help the amplified instrument and at times Goloubev’s excellent bass playing wasn’t heard to best effect. Insistence matched Law’s percussive approach with the inventive Tim Giles (Goloubev’s smile affirmed his appreciation of Giles, the ‘new boy’ of the trio). Law combined jazz and classical piano styles (a concert-goer remarked ‘I heard Bach in his playing’) most notably in Three Part Invention followed by The Quiet Dignity of the Minor. The use of an electric keyboard introduced an unwelcome discordant note. This proved short lived as the trio swung out on Brubeck’s          
In Your Own Sweet Way with Giles to the fore.
Russell

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