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In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

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Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Soundbone plays Led Zep @ Jazz Café. September 25

Chris Grieve (trombone & electronics), Graeme Stephen (guitar & loops) & David Carnegie (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photos courtesy of Mike Tilley).
This was fun. A legendary rock band repackaged as a ‘jazz trio’. Led Zeppelin tapped into the National Grid to generate a trillion watts through Marshall stacks, Soundbone created a big sound of their own filtering trombone and guitar through a box of tricks.  Newcastle City Hall veterans were largely absent from the Jazz Café, oblivious to the goings on in the upstairs room, perhaps sitting at home with a curry listening to Black Dog, bemoaning the fact that things ain’t what they used to be.
Black Dog opened the show – you could have been here! – and the trio pulled it off! A seated Graeme Stephen carved out the Jimmy Page riff, Chris Grieve’s clip-mic ‘bone pulsatingly melodic, drummer David Carnegie dead-on, sub-Bonham sledgehammer.
Stephen and Grieve, two thirds NeWt (the band, not p***** as), recently joined forces with Barbadian, ex-Tyneside resident, David Carnegie to play the Zeppelin ‘songbook’ and it really does work. Moby Dick featured DC’s explosive drumming, Misty Mountain Hop surfaced from a looping swirl of sound and Communication Breakdown lacked one thing, and one thing only, Robert Plant’s inimitable rock god vocals.
Immigrant Song, the folkie Going to California, the charts-reading Soundbone trio had what we already knew – immense chops. The affable Grieve suggested singing along to the tunes was in order – the chances were the audience had beaten him to it. To close a thoroughly entertaining evening Soundbone stretched out on Kashmir; Graeme Stephen developed a brilliant solo, Grieve sang into his now detached mic and Carnegie drove a tight trio to the final stop chord.  
Russell.

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