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Bebop Spoken There

Camila Meza: "Some tonalities or chords are colors to me: G major is blue, D major is orange and B minor is totally yellow." - (DownBeat July 2019)

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Today Sunday June 16

Afternoon

Jazz

Vieux Carré Hot 4 - Spanish City, Spanish City Plaza, Whitley Bay NE26 1BG. 12 noon. Free.

Musicians Unlimited - Park Inn, Park Road, Hartlepool TS26 9HU. Tel: 01429 233126. 1:00pm (doors 12 noon). Free.

Alice Grace & Ben Helm - Bonbar, Fenkle St., Newcastle NE1 5XU. Tel: 0191 232 8695. 1:30pm.

Jazz Social - Charts, Quayside, Newcastle NE1 3DX. Tel: 0191 338 7989. 4:00pm. Free.

Blues/Funk/Soul

The Panthers - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 3:00pm. Free.

Sour Mash Trio - The Schooner, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3AF. 5:00pm. Free.

Evening

Customs House Big Band - Customs House, Mill Dam, South Shields NE33 1ES. Tel: 0191 454 1234. 6:00pm. £13.00. ‘Swing on a Summer’s Evening’. The band’s 20th anniversary concert.

East Coast Jazz Jam - The Exchange, Howard Street, North Shields NE30 1SE. Tel: 0191 258 4111. 6:00pm. Free.

Gerry Richardson Quartet - The Globe, Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £6.00. ( (£3.00. student).

DU Jazz Soc jam session - Fabio’s Bar, Saddler St, Durham DH13NP. Tel: 0191 383 9290. 7:30pm. Free.

Francis Tulip Quartet - Black Bull, Bridge Street, Blaydon NE21 4JJ. Tel: 0191 414 2846. 7:30pm. £7.00. Line-up: Francis Tulip (guitar); Ben Lawrence (piano); John Pope (bass); Matt MacKellar (drums)

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, September 02, 2013

Saxophonists Take Note

Do other North-East jazz-lovers share my wish that modern-jazz saxophonists, not least the excellent younger ones, would feel less frequently obligated to demonstrate their undoubted skill in packing as many notes as possible into improvisations? They are presumably still strongly influenced by bebop era greats and that's fine here and there, but too often I find myself starting to glaze over from what I regard as too many notes.

Mike Jamieson

7 comments :

Anonymous said...

Try Kenny G then! By the way, this has been said before - but the comment was made about MOZART. "The famous complaint of Emperor Joseph II about The Marriage of Figaro - "too many notes, Mozart" - is generally perceived to be a gaffe by a blockhead. In fact, Joseph was echoing what nearly everybody, including his admirers, said about Mozart: he was so imaginative that he couldn't turn it off, and that made his music at times intense, even demonic. Hence Mozart's bad, or cautionary, reviews: "too strongly spiced"; "impenetrable labyrinths"; "bizarre flights of the soul"; "overloaded and overstuffed".

Still, in the end, the reputation of Mozart in his own time was about what it is today: he was considered an incomparable master."

Simon Spillett said...

Yawn...yawn...yawn....heard it all before!

Jazz = freedom of expression = play as you want to play. As far as I know, there is no magic number of notes that comprise a good jazz solo, but if any anoraks...sorry, fans...out there know how many there SHOULD be, I'd be grateful if they'd put the answer on a postcard and....




John Cowan said...

Louis once stated: "It's not the notes you play that are importand, it's the ones you don't play"
I rest my case!

James said...

Really? If you don't like 'lots of notes' sax solos, avoid gigs where the repertoire or style is post 1930.
Listening to jazz is subjective, like any of the arts, everyone brings their own experiences and expectations and inevitably hears the same music differently. Some might not understand what's happening at a musical or technical level but still engage with the performance and the broader sound and energy, it's up to you if you're willing to invest in what you hear or just have something familiar and unchallenging that you can dip in and out of.
There's lots I don't care to hear in jazz, but usually it's down to undeveloped musicality or overly developed technique at the expense of the music. Why not spend a bit of time with some more 'modern' records, see if you can get to a place where you can relate to what you are hearing.

Lance said...

There's really no case to answer. Miles played some very emotive solos using relatively few notes as did Chet Baker. Dizzy did the same using a lot of notes. Who's to say one is greater than the other. A musicians uses the tools at his disposal. If that player has practised hard and long enough to attain greater technical command of his instrument he's going to use that technique otherwise he may as well have swapped the woodshed for the pub.

Steve Andrews said...

I did swap the woodshed for the pub, Lance (hic!)...........

Miles Stones said...

The inference that Miles played fewer notes due to a limited technique is mistaken, he had the ability to burn through changes (check out the live albums Four And More/My Funny Valentine), the sparse playing was a conscious, stylistic choice.

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