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Bebop Spoken There

Anat Cohen: "With the tenor, it's so iconic with jazz. With the clarinet, I can improvise, but it doesn't have to be called jazz." - (DownBeat July 2019)

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Today Tuesday June 18

Afternoon

Jazz

Classic Swing - The Ship Inn, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 0191 251 3677. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Lickety Split - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB.Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

River City Jazzmen - Block & Tackle, Blackthorn Way, Ashington NE63 8NW. Tel: 01670 813983 (info). 8:00pm. £5.00. (inc raffle). Line-up inc special guest Don Fairley (trombone).

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, May 13, 2016

CD Review: Per Oddvar Johansen – Let's Dance

Per Oddvar Johansen (drums, violins, vibraphone, guitars, wood percussion and electronics); Helge Lien (piano); Torben Snekkestad (saxophones, reed trumpet).
(Review by Hugh C.)
Per Oddvar Johansen has played a prominent role in Norwegian music over many years but   Let's Dance is the first album under his own name.  He is joined in the trio by long-standing collaborators Helge Lien on piano and saxophonist Torben Stekkestad on this album of his own compositions.  
There are nine tracks on the album.  The atmosphere throughout is one of contemplation and meditation.  Let's Dance features Snekkestad's haunting soprano saxophone over slowly progressive piano and drums.  As might be expected, the whole has the air of a slow dance.  No. 7 a slightly more jaunty number (pun intended!)  Forest Flower begins with breathy saxophonics from Snekkestad.  Sounds created by Lien inside the piano begin to emerge, creating a feeling of expectancy – perhaps by the end the flower is open.  Flying has a similar abstract start, now incorporating violin and piano, the sound enhanced by electronics.  This, at 8:24, is the longest track on the album.  There is a very slow sonic build up, somewhat reminiscent of the Pink Floyd albums I used to listen to in my youth - the expected guitar, however, does not appear.  Panorama features the Lien's delicate piano and subtle brushwork from Johansen, over which Snekkestad lays a haunting melody.  The guitar does appear in Uluru (for Annette), along with birdsong and a fast flowing stream.  Impromptro features again Snekkestad's avant-garde saxophonic wizardry.  This segues straight into Families
where we are back in more familiar melodic territory (on the whole).  The final track, Song M, rounds off the disc with melodic saxophone and piano over Johansen's expressive drumwork.
Lovers of the “nordic sound” will warm to this album, though of course this may put others off.  The album as a whole is well crafted and packaged in suitably minimalist style to suit the music, with a black and white picture of mist clad pine trees.  Released by Edition Records (Cat No. EDN1068), Let's Dance is available now.
Samples.
Hugh.

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