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Bebop Spoken There

Artie Shaw: “I'm not interested in giving people what they want--I'm interested in making music.” – (DownBeat October 15, 1939).

Jason Marsalis: “There's so many places that this music can go and there's a lot yet to be discovered.'” – (DownBeat April 2018)

Today Tuesday March 20


Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.


Jam session - Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. Tel: 0191 222 9882. 8:00pm. Free.

Jazz Blowers’ Easter Concert - Hurworth Grange Community Centre, Hurworth Road, Hurworth Place, Darlington DL2 2BN. 7:00pm. £5.00. Concert in the Hadwin Lounge.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Paul Edis Trio @ The Jazz Café - Jan 12

Paul Edis (piano), Paul Susans (double bass) & Matthew MacKellar (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Mike Tilley)
At short notice, drummer Matthew MacKellar stepped in to replace an ailing Rob Walker. Triptych would return at a later date with this evening’s concert rebranded as the ‘Paul Edis Trio’. The two Pauls – Edis, piano, Susans, double bass – switched their attention from the original composition project that is Triptych to the standards repertoire associated with the classic jazz piano trio.

Right on time Edis, Susans and MacKellar opened with Harold Arlen’s It’s Only a Paper Moon. As pianist Edis explained this evening’s two sets would take a look at the work of some of the all-time great jazz pianists. Opening with the great and influential Nat ‘King’ Cole was a good way to begin. The standard set, the trio played Moten Swing from Oscar Peterson’s Night Train album with Edis noting that the great Canadian pianist was more than a little impressed on first hearing Art Tatum. To the disappointment of the comfortably full upstairs room at the Jazz Café, our pianist chose not to play some Art Tatum – maybe next time!

As Edis introduced Bill Evans a phone bleeped. Disgracefully the culprit was none other than your correspondent. Quick as a flash Edis said: I hope that will be in the review! In mitigation, the bleep occurred due to a communication from BSH’s Editor in Chief making arrangements for a future gig review. There’s no rest for the wicked. The Evans’ number – My Romance – included Edis’ fleeting quote from Stevie Wonder’s Isn’t She Lovely? and a fine solo from our fine depping drummer, Matt MacKellar.

Paul Edis the composer peppered the set including Snakes and Ladders followed by Horace Silver. Our pianist observed that The Preacher bore similarity to The Bare Necessities. How true! So, from now on, Horace Silver will be seen and heard through the prism of The Jungle Book! To close out a fine first set a familiar 7/8 hand clap introduced Brubeck’s Unsquare Dance. Terrific!

A good number of music students turned up, and, encouragingly, stayed on, they were there for the duration. Edis’ Whiskers resumed matters with ‘blistering’ best describing the trio’s searing pace as Matt MacKellar knocked out another tremendous solo. Lullaby of Birdland, Bill Evans’ Very Early, a Paul Edis composition – The Long Way Round – sounding, to your correspondent’s untutored ear,  not unlike George Benson’s This Masquerade (what say Dr Edis?), and Billy Strayhorn’s Lush Life in the style of Phineas Newborn Jnr. A hugely entertaining, varied set list, Edis and Susans have a working knowledge of the numbers in the pad (bassist Susans, centrally positioned between piano and drums, undemonstrative yet demonstrably an A-lister) and the young man of the trio, drummer Matt MacKellar, knew most, if not all, of the charts in front of him, handling matters with ease, using brushes as and when required with a preparedness to take command and kick it along on uptempo numbers. Two Thelonius Monk compositions concluded matters, in so doing illustrating MacKellar’s versatility; Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-are and the encore, a fabulous take on Rhythm-a-ning.

The Jazz Café’s first jam session of the year (Tuesday 16) just happens to feature pianist Edis and drummer MacKellar alongside the house trio’s main man, bassist Paul Grainger. Tomorrow Sunday at Darlington’s Quakerhouse MacKellar appears once again with the Francis Tulip Quartet. Oh yes!  


Patti said...

Another jazzily excellent night at our very own Jazz Cafe - a welcome return after the Christmas and New Year hiatus. Just as Russell says ....... anyway, I've been pondering on the question of similarities between The Preacher and Bare Necessities. First, Horace Silver's was written about 1955 - and the Disney film didn't come out until the mid 1960's. To add an extra, The Preacher also sounds a bit like Show Me The Way To Go Home - this non musician, but keen jazz listener thinks. Any other views?

Lance said...

Show Me The Way To Go Home is the generally accepted source of The Preacher although Bare Necessities does seem to have a similar progression.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.