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In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

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Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Friday, January 12, 2018

The Mo Scott Band @ The Globe, January 11

Mo Scott (vocals); Gary Dunn (guitar); Neil Harland (bass guitar); Paul Smith (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex)
‘Tyneside’s First Lady of the Blues’ declared the Globe publicity, and last night’s performance showed that to be undoubtedly the truth. The First Lady strutted her stuff with all the stops out. Gary on guitar did stunning solo work, Neil was the steady and strong bass, and the drums played as if there was no tomorrow. And it wasn’t just blues from this band, but rock, jazz, country, and even a touch of ska.
 Let Your Hair Down Baby demanded Mo to start the show, followed by a gutsy You Ain’t Nothing But A Hound Dog, which was far, far better than the version by Elvis, complete with canine-like wails from the guitar. I thought the guitar couldn’t get better, but it did on Fever. Then a complete change to the tenderness of Billie Holiday’s God Bless the Child, soulfully sung. It was good to hear so many songs which were either written or made famous by women, such as Nina Simone’s Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, and sung to a ska beat as well.  Next came Lone Star, a country song by Norah Jones, with an easy, smooth, relaxing tune. Back to the men, with B.B. King’s Never Make Your Move Too Soon and then Love Letters, first sung by Nat King Cole.  Back to blues, with a new one to me, Son House’s Don’t Mind People Grinnin’ In Your Face, and also When The Sun Rose This Morning. This last number ended the first half, so no holds were barred, ending with a last impassioned chorus from Mo.

The second half opened with a real rocker You Never can Tell. (Such a versatile band, I wonder what they’d do to the National Anthem, just a thought!) The guitar teased some interesting sounds from the electronic box attached, an intriguing squelchy sound, and deep tones, during this number, followed by a long sequence of riffs and grooves from the drums and guitar. Back to the women for Cry Myself to Sleep, a country song written by mother and daughter band Judd. Yellow Moon was feelingly sung, with stirring effects on drums. Then came Otis Redding’s (Sitting on the)  Dock Of The Bay; Love Me Like A Man; Little Winged (from the band only); Ray Charles’s Unchain My Heart; then Mo told us I Won’t Go Down That Big Road By Myself, before the final number, Rock Me Baby, which brought a great evening’s music to a more than satisfactory end.

Ann Alex

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