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Bebop Spoken There

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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.
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Born This Day
Louis Armstrong and Steve Andrews.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Classic Swing @ The Ship, Monkseaton - January 30

Bob Wade (trumpet & flugelhorn); Jim McBriarty (tenor saxophone, clarinet & vocals); Gordon Solomon (trombone); Colin Haikney (piano); Bill Colledge (bass) & Tommy Graham (drums)
(Review by Russell) 
A combination of holiday commitments, the ravages of flu and the returning Jim McBriarty brought about one or two changes to the line-up at this week’s Classic Swing session in Monkseaton. The Ship on Front Street continues to do good business on a Tuesday lunchtime and it isn’t surprising given the quality of musician assembled by trumpeter Bob Wade.
Arriving at the same time as genial trumpeter Miles Watson, seats were scarce, the choice of beer Theakston’s Lightfoot, MW’s tipple a drop of the hard stuff. It Don’t Mean a Thing, Rockin’ Chair – two early opportunities for the returning Jim McBriarty to exercise the tonsils. Classic Swing’s Bob Wade lead the line with his now familiar bravura style making its mark on Swingin’ the Blues. The material more swing era than the usual mid-week Dixieland fayre on offer at other nearby coastal jazz haunts, the frontline oozed class, and relaxed with it. Either side of Wade, regular reedsman Jim McBriarty, playing tenor and clarinet and singing a few numbers, and, depping for Don Fairley, the one and only Gordon Solomon. Bebop Spoken Here’s Editor-in-Chief waxed lyrical reviewing last week’s session, delighting in the unexpected appearance of Gordon Solomon. One week on, our trombone maestro was once again to be heard playing on the session, this time as a first call dep for Don Fairley. Your reviewer is happy to confirm LL’s comments were 100% accurate. Ten years without playing a gig, then sitting-in, it was as if he’d been gigging non-stop all these years!
The first set drew to a close with Solomon’s fine playing on Just Squeeze Me, Tommy Graham’s delicate brushwork and some flugelhorn from Wade, followed by Perdido.

Second set drummer Graham blazed a trail on Caravan, the boys cooled down on Up a Lazy River and McBriarty sang I’m Beginning to See the Light. The frontline went to the bar leaving the stage to pianist Colin Haikney and his rhythm section partners Bill Colledge, bass, and Graham. Haikney played a request – Take the A Train…a good choice. The afternoon’s penultimate number proved to be the highlight – Jim McBriarty singing I’m Confessin’ with marvellous solos by Solomon and Haikney. Bob Wade brought matters to a close with a rousing take on Indiana
Russell.           

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