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Bebop Spoken There

Buddy Rich: "You either swing a band or you don't swing a band - (Metronome April 1956).

Sinclair Traill: “Well I don't think he (Chet Baker) can sing either.” – (Jazz Journal August 1956).

Fred Rowe Funeral Arrangements

The funeral of well-respected and much-loved trumpet player Fred Rowe will take place on Wednesday, December 13 at 14:00 hrs: Lytham Crematorium (Regent Ave, Lytham Saint Annes FY8 4AB). Afterwards - All warmly welcome for refreshments at 2 Chapel Close, Wesham, Preston PR4 3HB.
No flowers by request donations to Parkinson's UK. Should you wish to donate to Parkinson’s research, please contact the Funeral Directors (J & A Porter Funeral Services, Windsor Court, Windsor Road, Ansdell, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire FY8 1AH. Tel: 01253735423) or place in a collection box that will be provided at the end of the service.
"Please do come along, we would love to see as many of Fred’s friends as possible" - Joan Rowe and family.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance

Today Monday December 11

Afternoon

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 NE30 4QS. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, February 04, 2017

New Century Ragtime Orchestra with Keith Nichols & Nick Ward @ The Caedmon Hall, Gateshead. February 3

(Review by Russell)
Welcome to the New Century Ragtime Orchestra’s twentieth annual concert in Gateshead… what an achievement! Several members of the orchestra were there at the beginning. As much as band mastermind Dave Kerr tries, he just can’t get shot of them! Seriously, the longevity of an orchestra dedicated to uncovering lesser known charts of the period (c.1890-1935) and presenting the music to an audience on a regular basis is no mean feat.
Befitting of the occasion, Keith Nichols, a long-standing friend of the orchestra, appeared as guest star, together with Brummie period percussion specialist Nick Ward. A full house at Caedmon Hall enjoyed two sets of ragtime, swing and popular song. Sweet Jennie Lee for starters, then Ellington (MC Steve Andrews joked that they might as well get Ellington out of the way!), Cole Porter’s Let’s Do It (a first vocal feature of the evening for Caroline Irwin) and I Can’t Give You Anything But Love (Baby).

Keith Nichols’ first contribution, accompanied by Nick Ward (the orchestra made a dash for the bar, not that they didn’t appreciate Nichols’ talents, they simply wanted another drink!) included Maceo Pinkard’s Sugar and a brilliant rendition of James P Johnson’s The Mule Walk.

Caroline Irwin returned to the stage with the reassembled orchestra to sing Irving Berlin’s You’d be Surprised. Steve Andrews has a penchant for gently poking fun at one or two members of the band and on this occasion he had Ms Irwin in his sights. The diminutive Irwin gave as good as she got – if you dish it out…To close an enjoyable first set Andrews himself sang Nagasaki (tongue-twisting lyrics to boot) and played with his new toy – a baritone saxophone! Someone enquired how much it was worth, Andrews replied: I’d accept two grand for it!

Numerous raffle prizes found a home, someone found the band in the bar, and soon we were into the second set. Deep Henderson, then Chattanooga Stomp (Keith Stephen, on banjo, Gavin Lee, clarinet). Irwin wanted to Get Out and Get Under the Moon following up with a new chart in the pad It Was Only a Sun Shower. Target number two: Andrews waxed lyrical about Louis Armstrong and his world famous recording of West End Blues. Looking at Graham Hardy, MC Andrews wished the bearded trumpeter all the best. Hardy stood up…Louis’ intro surely a terrifying prospect? It should be noted that G Hardy lives to tell the tale. Take a bow Graham!

Keith Nichols and Nick Ward resumed their partnership with a selection from the 1928 stage show Blackbirds of 1928 (the production made Adelaide Hall’s name). At times playing at a bewildering speed, Nichols found time, without breaking stride, to quip: You think this looks easy! A virtuoso.
Steve Andrews – baritone sax in hand – made it a trio in joining the evening’s guest stars to play Sophisticated Lady. A magical performance ensued, prefaced by typical jazz musician wit. Steve and Keith suggesting two alternative titles…Suffocated Lady in A Flat or Suffocated Lady in a flat. Spot the difference.
A marvellous evening with the New Century Ragtime Orchestra. Here’s to the next twenty years!
Russell.          

The New Century Ragtime Orchestra: Ed Cross (violin), Jim McBriarty (clarinet, alto sax, soprano sax & vocals), Alan Marshall (clarinet, alto sax & soprano sax), Gavin Lee (clarinet, tenor sax & soprano sax),Steve Andrews (MC, clarinet, baritone sax & vocals), Alex Lewis (trumpet), Graham Hardy (trumpet), Neville Hartley (trombone), Colin Haikney (piano), Keith Stephen (banjo & guitar), Phil Rutherford (sousaphone) & Caroline Irwin (vocals) + Keith Nichols (piano & vocals) & Nick Ward (drums)  

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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