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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Alan Barnes & Paul Edis @ The Gala Theatre. Feb 10

Alan Barnes (alto sax & clarinet) & Paul Edis (piano)
(Review by Russell/photo courtesy of Doug Hollingsworth)
 Sleet, threatening snow, fell, making for a picture postcard backdrop through the windows of the Gala’s Studio Theatre. Tickets for this lunchtime concert sold out earlier in the week. The duo of Alan Barnes and Paul Edis playing a few tunes together guaranteed a full house with all seats in the one hundred capacity top floor Durham venue occupied in time for the one o’clock start.
On Green Dolphin Street for starters, a Jobim bossa, Alan Barnes (playing clarinet on this number only) suggesting to pianist Paul Edis that he could set up ‘a bit of a vamp’, with mid-winter swirling snowflakes licking the window panes, then a warming Blues in F, replete with not only Barnesian quotes but equally rapid-fire lines plucked from Edis’ memory bank.
Jimmy Van Heusen’s Here’s That Rainy Day an early highlight, the quality maintained with Monk’s Ask Me Now (Barnes enquiring of Edis: Are you going to be quirky?), a couple of the altoist’s own compositions, some Cole Porter, things were going well!
Barnes revealed that the only number they had played through prior to the doors opening was the mighty Charles Mingus’ Nostalgia in Times Square. This produced fine solos from the duo. What to play to close the set? Cherokee? ventured Edis. Oh, no! replied Barnes. They settled for every jam session favourite - Rhythm Changes. Barnes and Edis would later in the day meet up in Darlington.             
Russell.

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