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Bebop Spoken There

Rickie Lee Jones: "There's lots of music and not so much celebrity. I guess I'll stay here [New Orleans] for a while if it doesn't get washed away in the flood." - (The Observer 18.04.21)

Archive quotes.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Postage

13,107 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 526 of them this year alone and, so far, 81 this month (April 16).

Bar Manager Required

The Jazz Co-op are looking for an experienced bar manager who can be available to start when The Globe reopens in May.

Preference will be given to a suitably qualified person who lives relatively near to The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD.

Interested parties please follow this link.

Coming soon ...

April 29: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at The Holystone.

May 20 Maine Street Jazzmen are back at Sunniside Social Club.
May 23: Vieux Carré Hot Four are back at The Spanish City.

June 2: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club.
June 7: Jazz in the Afternoon are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club.

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Prince and the Prince of Darkness

The worldwide publicity surrounding the death of rock legend Prince left me with nothing further to say. After all, he had little jazz affinity - or did he?
I began to wonder after reading a 1989 quote from Miles Davis saying "He [Prince] can be the new Duke Ellington of our times" seeing in Prince a kindred spirit to himself. The two did record and Davis featured several Prince compositions.Investigating further, I discovered references to Madhouse, a jazz/fusion band he formed with saxist Eric Leeds in Minnesota although I haven't heard them.
The photo shows Miles and Prince on NYE 1987 at Paisley Park.
This link tells more about the connection with Miles
Prince died on April 21, age 57, sadly missed by his many fans.
Rest In Peace.
Lance.

4 comments :

Patti said...

Dance, Music, Sex, Romance - what else is there to say indeed! What a genius .... and I've always loved the colour purple!

Richard Waddington said...

Having significant knowledge of Princes' music: my brother and best friend travelled to Edinburgh and Scotland respectively to see him, I have another friend who is a big fan, my wife likes him and I've heard a number of his albums and have been working through them chronologically; knowing Miles as an idol, or as near to an idol as I do these days, I can't help wondering whether Miles was being mischievous comparing Prince to Duke, who he refers to in his auto/ biography as the King of Jazz. Like Sinatra saying ' Something ' was the best love song for fifty years and attributing it to Lemon and McCartney.
Like Bowie, Prince was an accomplished popstar, doing the haircuts, clothes and attempting to create a media mystique, and like Bowie, he was one of the best though, unlike Bowie he was a fine guitarist, though the multi-instrumentalist bit is overstated.
Like Michael Jackson he was a better popstar than he was a Soul Artist.
He made enough good music to fill up a CD while Miles made dozens of great albums, many of which should be rated amongst the best albums ever made, and Duke made countless classics and may well be Americas' great composer.
Long after his contribution to music was over Miles remained a prickly character and we possibly shouldn't take everything he said too seriously.

Patti said...

Maybe it should be Music, Dance, Romance, Sex - in that order! But it probably wouldn't have scanned quite so well, with Prince's music!

Richard Waddington said...

Just come across an interesting quote in Rickey Vincents' tome 'Funk'.' When pop superstar Prince intimated that ' it's time for jazz to die ' in 1983, he touched the pulse of the musical community.' Given the trajectory of Miles at that time and his position within the jazz community which was turning its back on electricity, his comment seems less surprising. Plus there was that wardrobe to browse through.

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