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Bebop Spoken There

Chick Corea: "Things feel good when there's a lot of music happening." - (DownBeat August 2005 (unpublished. Published posthumously April 2021 ).

Archive quotes.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Postage

13,107 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 526 of them this year alone and, so far, 81 this month (April 16).

Bar Manager Required

The Jazz Co-op are looking for an experienced bar manager who can be available to start when The Globe reopens in May.

Preference will be given to a suitably qualified person who lives relatively near to The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD.

Interested parties please follow this link.

Coming soon ...

April 29: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at The Holystone.

May 20 Maine Street Jazzmen are back at Sunniside Social Club.
May 23: Vieux Carré Hot Four are back at The Spanish City.

June 2: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club.
June 7: Jazz in the Afternoon are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Leash @ Jazz Café, Newcastle – April 22

Mark Williams (gtr); Andy Champion (bs gtr); Adrian Tilbrook (dms).
(Review by Stephen Tulip/Photo courtesy of Vincent Chang)
Effects pedals seem to have been the order of the day in Newcastle on Friday with Andy Champion and Mark Williams measuring up against each other at the Jazz Café.
It's the first time I've heard Andy on electric bass and, if anything, he's even more impressive, drawing on both Jaco Pastorius and Stanley Clarke, but doesn't everybody?  increasingly dominating the soloing, particularly in part 2, though the Weather Report mantra - we never solo, we always solo - also seems appropriate to this band. One person suggested the guitar and bass had swapped roles.
I know Mark’s playing quite well by now and a relative of mine had hoped to get his hat-trick playing with his local guitar heroes at the jam session, but the axe was hung up by the time we got there; another time perhaps.
Adrian Tilbrook is one of the most respected drummers around but was still a revelation, maintaining a semblance of order through some seriously abstract, far-out, free fusion that was bombarding him from right and left, and looking like he was having a ball the whole time.
It's a cliché but it's true, this is no guitar trio, but the ultimate north-east jazz super power trio of equals (and try saying all that after a skin-full). In short, the cream.
Comparisons abound, including various John McLaughlin groups and followers and Mark has a love of Pat Metheny that he wears on his sleeve. Also bands from the jazzy/experimental end of progrock and in Mark, (as with Steve Glendenning rocking out ), I always hear Jan Akkerman circa Focus 3, an album under-rated by prog-rockers and largely unknown to jazzers.
Insomuch as such things are relevant - and John Surman gave us permission not to concern ourselves with song titles - the second piece seemed more straightforward jazz in a Wes Montgomery vein; one intro suggested the proverbial Ravi Shankar tune-up (though thankfully nobody applauded ) and the set was sprinkled with melodies half recognised and by the end I was hearing Santana in the mix.
One tiny reservation, which is a personal thing, no doubt based on my own background, which applies to virtually every jazz guitarist of the moment, is that they all seem reluctant to completely let rip. By the mid-seventies even Zappa, who'd mocked his popstar antics, accepted the language of Hendrix and McLaughlin accepted it right off, though he saved turning up to eleven for the Mahavishnu Orchestra. Perhaps it's now considered a cliché or passé but it seems to me, to have this weapon and not use it is akin to an orchestra omitting the violin section, a seriously soulful singer supressing their pain, or Santana telling his percussionists to stand down. Towards the end of the set, following a lengthy freeform dialogue, I was all set for the guitar to spontaneously combust but instead we got a burst of St Thomas, which was actually just as good.
The encore was an ACV track which found all 3 giving a final workout at full pelt. Andy pointed out they were 60% of Mark 1 and, when asked where the other 2 were, offered Prince and Victoria Wood followed by the retort 'too soon?'
With something at the Globe and a very tempting night in Darlington, attendance was pretty good with us oldies the most appreciative and those pesky thirty somethings a little noisy, though not disrespectful or distracting and the oldies didn't seem to mind unless they're simply used to it. It's a shame, with every household now owning Kind of Blue, at least, more of the jazz/ music community around Newcastle don't get to hear more of the great bands who play the citys' jazz venues.  
Somebody said he wouldn't speak to me again if I gave a bad review. As if I could.
Steven

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