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Bebop Spoken There

Rickie Lee Jones: "There's lots of music and not so much celebrity. I guess I'll stay here [New Orleans] for a while if it doesn't get washed away in the flood." - (The Observer 18.04.21)

Archive quotes.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Postage

13,107 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 526 of them this year alone and, so far, 81 this month (April 16).

Bar Manager Required

The Jazz Co-op are looking for an experienced bar manager who can be available to start when The Globe reopens in May.

Preference will be given to a suitably qualified person who lives relatively near to The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD.

Interested parties please follow this link.

Coming soon ...

April 29: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at The Holystone.

May 20 Maine Street Jazzmen are back at Sunniside Social Club.
May 23: Vieux Carré Hot Four are back at The Spanish City.

June 2: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club.
June 7: Jazz in the Afternoon are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

GIJF: John Surman w. Alexander Hawkins Trio @ Sage Gateshead. April 16

John Surman (bar/sop); Alexander Hawkins (pno); Neil Charles (bs); Tom Skinner (dms).
(Review by Lance/Photo Credit: John Watson/Jazzcamera.co.uk).
It was back in the late 1960s when, still in his early '20s, Surman emerged as the fastest baritone saxophone player in the west (country) when he was the anchor man of the, then, revolutionary Mike Westbrook group. Fifty years on, He's still fast out of the blocks and a stayer too! The first piece lasted 30 minutes. 
"I won't bother with titles," said Surman, "They're meaningless!"
Let's face it, with many contemporary originals, this is true. Commendable honesty.
Surman appears, like Evan Parker, to have conquered the circular breathing thing. At one point he appeared to be able to play shimmering notes until the cows came home or the audience left without breathing. Some did leave. The second number was a mere 15 minutes - I felt short changed! Hawkins was let loose on this one with a solo of such ferocity it made Cecil Taylor sound like Russ Conway
. Charles played a lot of bowed bass albeit, seemingly, without any resin on the bow - even jazz musicians have to face up to austerity cuts. Skinner played in and around the gaps, occasionally exploding. There were times when it all came together and times when it didn't. I didn't hang around for the next number - it could have been a 3-day event and, besides, the Northern Monkey Brass Band were on the Concourse...
Lance.

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