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Bebop Spoken There

Vadim Neselovskyi, Professor of Jazz Piano, Berklee College of Music: “Every pianist has to deal with a very complex left-hand part at some point. This is the essential pianistic experience – to split your brain into two halves and execute two very different tasks at the same time.” – (Down Beat September 2017).

Roscoe Mitchell: “To me, improvisation is trying to improve your skills so you can make these on-point compositional decisions. That takes practice.” – (Down Beat September 2017)

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Today Tuesday September 26

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Black Bull, 98 Front St., East Boldon NE36 0SG. 1pm. Free. 0191 5365127. 2nd of 6 consecutive gigs. 2 mins from East Boldon metro.
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Evening
Maine Street Jazzmen - Royal British Legion, West Jesmond Ave., Newcastle NE2 3EX. 8:30pm. £5.
Charles Gordon (solo piano) - Redwood Bar, Vermont Hotel, Newcastle. 10pm - midnight. Free.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, November 30, 2014

Diachronix at the Jazz Cafe, November 29

Gabrielle Heller (vocals, electronics, percussion); Steve Glendinning (guitar)
(Review by Ann Alex/photo by Mike Tilley).
There was a full house for this unusual gig from Gabi and Steve, including people from Germany and Brazil.  The material covered jazz standards, Gabi originals in cabaret style, a bit of blues, and numbers written by Sting, Billie Holiday, and others.  The general theme was ‘The City’, well illustrated by adventurous use of electronics, with sirens and people rushing about.  And the percussion made an effective appearance even in the first song, about not being able to get out of the city, when Gabi made a defiant ‘chock, chock’ sound by hitting a bar with a stick.  (What is this called,  BSH readers?)   Steve showed his considerable talents throughout the whole set, many long solos, up and down scales, chords galore, guitar wizardry, but always fitting to the song being sung.
We had Gabi’s song Wallflower; then a song about early life before cities, with made-up language which sounded like ‘skee ya dum day’, very imaginative; Sting’s Hole In My Life with a scat refrain; a softer-voiced Angel Eyes with an exquisite guitar solo; Holiday’s Tell Me More And More And Then Some in an upbeat version; songs dedicated to the boat people, with an African style introduction, Kurt Weill’s My Ship, merged with a Latin bossa novarish song Little Boat, and to round off the first set, a blues, Sail On.
The second set opened with a song by Queen Dead On Time, with another good guitar solo to suit travelling in a city; then Gabi read excerpts from a poem Electricity (I’m not sure if this works at a jazz gig); a lovely version of the mythical Nature Boy followed; then came I Will Say Goodbye; True Love, written by Gabi and her husband; Tom Waits’ song about putting on a performance, with interesting use of a walkie talkie microphone. Kurt Weill’s Speak Low was the last song I heard properly as the Metro called me home, so I left to the sounds of Billie Holiday’s Don’t Explain.
I enjoyed this gig immensely, but I wonder if the sound levels needed some adjustment as Gabi’s voice was very loud on some songs, giving a very in-your-face effect.  Just a thought and I don’t know if other people noticed this.
Ann Alex

1 comment :

  1. The "Chock Chock" was either claves or castanets or a combination of both!
    And yes, particularly down front the sound level did seem high.

    ReplyDelete

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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