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Bebop Spoken There

Dee Dee Bridgewater: “ Our world is becoming a very ugly place with guns running rampant in this country... and New Orleans is called the murder capital of the world right now ". Jazzwise, May 2024.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST!

Holly Cooper, Mouthpiece Music: "Lance writes pull quotes like no one else!"

Simon Spillett: A lovely review from the dean of jazz bloggers, Lance Liddle...

Josh Weir: I love the writing on bebop spoken here... I think the work you are doing is amazing.

Postage

16382 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 16 years ago. 262 of them this year alone and, so far, 59 this month (April 20).

From This Moment On ...

April

Sun 21: Jamie Toms Quartet @ Queen’s Hall, Hexham. 3:00pm.
Sun 21: 4B @ The Ticket Office, Whitley Bay Metro Station. 3:00pm. Free.
Sun 21: Lindsay Hannon: Tom Waits for No Man @ Holy Grale, Durham. 5:00pm.
Sun 21: The Jazz Defenders @ Cluny 2. Doors 6:00pm. £15.00.
Sun 21: Edgar Rubenis @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 7:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig. Blues & ragtime guitar.
Sun 21: Tweed River Jazz Band @ Barrels Ale House, Berwick. 7:00pm. Free.
Sun 21: Art Themen with the Dean Stockdale Trio @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm. £10.00. +bf. JNE. SOLD OUT!

Mon 22: Harmony Brass @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm. Free.

Tue 23: Vieux Carre Hot 4 @ Victoria & Albert Inn, Seaton Delaval. 12:30-3:30pm. £12.00. ‘St George’s Day Afternoon Tea’. Gig with ‘Lashings of Victoria Sponge Cake, along with sandwiches & scones’.
Tue 23: Jalen Ngonda @ Newcastle University Students’ Union. POSTPONED!

Wed 24: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm. Free.
Wed 24: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Social Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Free. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 24: Sinatra: Raw @ Darlington Hippodrome. 7:30pm. Richard Shelton.
Wed 24: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm. Free.
Wed 24: Death Trap @ Theatre Royal, Newcastle. 7:30pm. Rambert Dance Co. Two pieces inc. Goat (inspired by the music of Nina Simone) with on-stage musicians.

Thu 25: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, Whitley Road, North Tyneside. 1:00pm. Free.
Thu 25: Jim Jams @ King’s Hall, Newcastle University. 1:15pm. Jim Jams’ funk collective.
Thu 25: Gateshead Jazz Appreciation Society @ Gateshead Central Library, Gateshead. 2:30pm.
Thu 25: Death Trap @ Theatre Royal, Newcastle. 7:30pm. Rambert Dance Co. Two pieces inc. Goat (inspired by the music of Nina Simone) with on-stage musicians.
Thu 25: Jeremy McMurray & the Pocket Jazz Orchestra @ Arc, Stockton. 8:00pm.
Thu 25: Kate O’Neill, Alan Law & Paul Grainger @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig.
Thu 25: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman’s Club, Middlesbrough. 8:30pm. Guests: Richie Emmerson (tenor sax); Neil Brodie (trumpet); Adrian Beadnell (bass); Garry Hadfield (keys).

Fri 26: Graham Hardy Quartet @ The Gala, Durham. 1:00pm. £8.00.
Fri 26: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm. Free.
Fri 26: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms. 1:00pm. Free.
Fri 26: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ The Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm. £5.00.
Fri 26: Paul Skerritt with the Danny Miller Big Band @ Glasshouse, Gateshead. 8:00pm.
Fri 26: Abbie Finn’s Finntet @ Traveller’s Rest, Darlington. 8:00pm. Opus 4 Jazz Club.

Sat 27: Abbie Finn Trio @ The Vault, Darlington. 6:00pm. Free.
Sat 27: Papa G’s Troves @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig.

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

Scarborough Jazz Festival Day One - Sept. 24

(Steve T w. Hans Koller)

A destination for many childhood holidays and adult short-stays, Scarborough is always like coming home and is one of my favourite festivals. Beyond the Spa it’s a town in trouble, but we know a thing about that in the north east too.

It was at Scarborough that I first heard Rob Luft and enquired as to who is this phenomenal guitarist. He was already a master virtuoso but also  a  very rounded musician with intelligent use of pedals and exemplary comping. As the senior co-leader, saxophonist Dave O’Higgins was cool and in full control, taking on one of the greatest musicians ever.


Like Sonny – written by Trane about another of the greatest musicians ever – and Straight Street were followed by a beautiful, extended prog-rock style guitar intro to Naima; more Steve Howe of Yes than the darker tones of Robert Fripp from King Crimson.

 

I’ve seen the mighty Ross Stanley many times, including twice with Steve Howe’s Jazz Trio, and recently described him as a force of nature. O’Higgins claimed this afternoon set was his third of the day and introduced him as an ‘unstoppable terminator’ and audience response would suggest they agreed.

 

Four in One was followed by a brave interpretation of an already demanding Giant Steps and had no need of their apology in advance in case they messed it up.

 

O’Higgins played a short intro to Monk’s 'Round Midnight, a ballad that’s now generally considered – except by Monk aficionados -  as having best been interpreted by Miles Davis (a bit like Hendrix’s All Along the Watchtower). Minor Mishap followed - a piece by Trane (written by Tommy Flanagan) - before Epistrophy closed the set, which threw me because I thought it had opened the set. This is typical of my experience with Monk; I will likely keep playing him forever, but I’m often more fascinated by him than particularly enjoying the experience in any usual sense of the word.  A Monk piece is a Monk piece.

 

Four world class musicians playing two of the all time greats. A fantastic start.

 

I‘d neglected to remind my long-suffering, north west born (far) better half that on this side of the country, if you face out to sea, north is left, so we ended up in an Airbnb with a much longer walk, that cut into our schedule and my feet.

 

We made it back for the Julian Joseph Trio, one of those treats that make festivals so special. I’ve been a self-confessed piano trio philistine for almost forty years so I hadn’t researched the artist, I didn’t need to know what it was he was playing, had no intention of buying an album, and was just happy to explore, miss a bit, check out the CDs, but still thoroughly enjoy the music and their playing.   

 

Hans Koller’s magnificent thirteen piece orchestra paying tribute to Bird closed the first day and was a revelation. A charismatic, amiable and witty German pianist and bandleader, his enthusiasm proved infectious throughout the band and the room, as he prowled around the stage, sometimes sitting side-saddle at his piano and occasionally hiding behind the curtains to conceal his excitement.

Billie’s Bounce was followed by Hot House, which I’d always thought was written by Dizzy but was apparently Tadd Dameron. The familiar melody took it’s time seeping through. OFF THE SCALE. Compere Alan Barnes had introduced the set saying the existence of Charlie Parker records in the world was a ‘reason to be cheerful’. BSH Editor is also a devotee and I felt his pain at not being there.

 

Milestones was followed by Word of Bird, a tribute by Ornette Coleman from his album Song X and Koller managed to get some Bird in there with Ornette. He succumbed to do Parker’s Mood despite his reservation that it’s perfect and should be left in peace. Passport was a rhythm changes where he imagined ‘Lee Konitz talking to Charlie Parker’.

 

I think Quasimodo was the last piece and I think this may have been one of the best things I’ve ever seen.

 

My feet were hurting, and I turned 60 during the walk back to our digs, but the anticipation of day two was palpable. Steve T      

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