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Bebop Spoken There

Ed Palermo: "[Frank] Zappa's humor was very rarely self-deprecating, and mine is almost always self-deprecating. The beauty of it is that no one gets hurt." - (DownBeat February, 2021)

Archive quotes.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Postage

13,191 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 610 of them this year alone and, so far, 18 this month (May 4).

2021 APPJAG (All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group)

Coming soon ...



May 6: Vieux Carré Jazzmen at The Holystone. (CANCELLED!).

May 13: Vieux Carré Jazzmen at The Holystone (weather permitting).
May 20 Maine Street Jazzmen are back at Sunniside Social Club.
May 23: Vieux Carré Hot Four are back at The Spanish City.

June 21: Jazz in the Afternoon are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club. (Revised date).
June 23: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club. (Revised date).

Saturday, April 17, 2021

Luke Carlos O'Reilly live streaming I Too, Sing America from Small's, NYC - April 16

Chris McBride (alto sax); Josh Evans (trumpet); Luke Carlos O'Reilly (piano); Luques Curtis (double bass); Mark Whitfield Jr. (drums)

Luke Carlos O'Reilly introduced this Friday evening set saying he hoped his sidemen were onboard with his project. Our bandleader/pianist adding, if they weren't, he'd be making some calls. The inference being they'd be replaced, double quick! It was, of course, tongue in cheek, they were as one. 

The on stage quintet at Small's played music from O'Reilly's latest album I Too Sing America: A Black Man's Diary and from start to finish O'Reilly stood defiant in the face of those who would deny the proposition 'Black lives matter'. And this, the title of the opening number,  Black Lives Matter, set the tone. Chris McBride, an ebullient character, blew alto sax alongside trumpeter Josh Evans. The quintet's sound, incorporating jazz, soul and old school swing were the building blocks of O'Reilly's arresting compositions. The man who studied music in Philadelphia (Mulgrew Miller and Bruce Barth, two influential figures) let the music speak for itself and he spoke for himself, insisting 'Black Lives Matter'. 

At times McBride's alto playing drew comparison with say, Matana Roberts or Soweto Kinch, underpinned by Mark Whitfield Jr.'s laser-like drum patterns. O'Reilly said the spelling of Amerikkka, containing the letter 'k' written three times, should be an obvious reference. The point wasn't lost on his online audience. Brotherman (In Blue) alluded to Black Americans in police uniform, McBride saying little more, the music would again speak volumes. It did, one section featured O'Reilly's swinging piano playing in classic trio format with bassist Luques Curtis and drummer Whitfield Jr..

To close, another of O'Reilly's commentaries on present day America (Amerikkka?) referencing the deaths of women at the hands of law enforcement officers, Say Her Name. It had been an interesting hour, it is to be hoped that post-pandemic Luke Carlos O'Reilly will be able to take his music on the road. It should be heard.  
Russell
                
Set list: Black Lives MatterAmerikkkaBrotherman (In Blue)Say Her Name.   

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