Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

John McDonough (reviewing Bright Red Dog’s In Vivo): “When you improvise on nothing, that’s what you get”. - DownBeat August 2021

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Postage

13,508 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 926 of them this year alone and, so far, 90 this month (July 27).

Monday, March 29, 2021

Ten north east greats. 1 - Jack Brymer

Now that The Tens have started to take off, I thought I'd post one remembering those north east musicians who have left us, albeit not before leaving their mark on the national/international scene. However, by the time I got to number 6 it soon became apparent that this was going to be twice as long as War and Peace or half as long as a Steve T comment (only joking Steve!) So, I decided instead to post just one per day and this is the first one.

Jack Brymer (1915 - 2003). Born in South Shields, Brymer is best remembered as probably the leading classical clarinetist of his generation. However, he was also a jazzman at heart and occasionally on stage. 

I first heard him on a demo record put out by Boosey and Hawkes promoting their, at the time, revolutionary plastic Regent clarinet in which, apart from some Mozart, he rattles off a few tasty Benny Goodman licks.  

In his autobiography, Where I Sit, he recalls dining at the Hi-Hat Club in Boston and meeting Wardell Gray, Buddy de Franco and other famous jazzmen - he grabbed their autographs on a club menu - that must be a collector's item if it is still in existence today. 

In New Orleans he jammed with Alphonse Picou and Papa Celestin and the book also has a photo of him blowing alongside Hank Shaw, Don Rendell, Ike Isaacs and John Dankworth. On top of all this there are many memories of him working with Sir Thomas Beecham.

The boy done good! Lance

1 comment :

Cormac Loane said...

Around about 1972, I visited the King's Hall at Newcastle University to hear Jack Brymer giving a beautiful performance of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto, accompanied by the New Tyneside Orchestra. During the opening tutti section of the first movement - before the clarinet's first entry - Jack could be seen giving little waves to friends of his as he recognised them in the audience. It all felt very affable and informal - more like a Geordie jazz gig than a symphony orchestra concert!

A couple of years later, when I was a student at Goldsmiths' College, London, I was nearly lucky enough to jam alongside Jack. The Goldsmiths' Music Society invited him to be the guest speaker at their annual dinner (partly because Goldsmiths' was where Jack himself had trained as a teacher in the 1930s). After we'd finished eating, Jack told endless, hilarious anecdotes about his world tours with André Previn and the London Symphony Orchestra, etc. And then, whilst I was playing a set with the college jazz band to round off the evening, he kindly walked over to compliment us on our playing - we invited him to join in, but sadly he had left his clarinet at home!

Blog Archive