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Bebop Spoken There

Abdullah Ibrahim: "For me jazz is the highest form of music." - (DownBeat, September 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Saturday August 24

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Mellow Baku - St Augustine's Parish Centre, Larchfield Street, Darlington DL3 7TG. 12:30pm. £10.00. (under 16s free). Line-up: Mello Baku (vocals), John Hallam (reeds), Andy Dickens (trumpet), Ian Bateman (trombone), Tom Kincaid (piano), Rachel Hayward (guitar, banjo), John Day (double bass), Nick Millward (drums).

Jo Harrop w Paul Edis Trio - Ushaw College, Ushaw DH7 9RH. 1:00pm. £10.00. Ushaw Jazz Festival.

Boys of Brass - Bill Quay Beer & Music Festival, Brack Terrace, Bill Quay, Gateshead NE10 0TT. 3:00-4:30pm. (Festival 1:00-11pm). Tickets: £10.

Xhosa Cole-Francis Tulip Quintet - Ushaw College, Ushaw DH7 9RH. 4:00pm. £8.00. Ushaw Jazz Festival.

Evening

Matt Anderson & Paul Edis - Ushaw College, Ushaw DH7 9RH. 6:00pm. £6.00. Ushaw Jazz Festival.

Tony Kofi & the Organisation - Ushaw College, Ushaw DH7 9RH. 8:00pm. £14.00. & £12.00. Ushaw Jazz Festival.

Picturehouse Deluxe + Kay Greyson - Bobik’s, Punch Bowl Hotel, Jesmond Road, Jesmond, Newcastle NE2 3JY. 8:00pm. £5.00. Line-up: Georgia Turnbull (vocals & keys), Thomas Dixon (reeds), Jamie Mackay (guitar), Adam Cornell (bass), Ben Fitzgerald (drums).

Jam session - Ushaw College, Ushaw DH7 9RH. 10:00pm. Free. Ushaw Jazz Festival.

Blues/Funk/Soul

Teresa Watson Band - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Mo Scott – She’s Our Pride and Joy @ The Jazz Café - Dec 15

Mo Scott (vocals), Dave Dryden (guitar), Neil Harland (bass) & Paul Smith (drums)
(Review by Russell) 
Christmas party time at the Jazz Café! The promise of ‘free festive nibbles’ attracted the interest of Bebop Spoken Here, and, if our luck was in, there was the prospect of pulling a cracker. The sweet little angel atop the Christmas tree, Mo Scott, assembled her A-Team line-up, and, without fanfare, ripped into T-Bone Shuffle and Hound Dog.
Tyneside’s Empress of the Blues and her men in black played a blinder from the off; guitarist Dave Dryden is one hell of a musician. It struck your reviewer that Scott doesn’t countenance working on a gig with other than the very best of blues guitarists. Dryden, Gary Dunn, and for many years, Rod Sinclair, to name but three, all top drawer. Bassist Neil Harland is a busy working musician, and, as and when he’s available, Mo readily secures his services. Teesside-based drummer Paul Smith is equally busy and his presence in the engine room ensured a memorable night of rhythm and blues, Tex-Mex and more was in store.
Scott sang Ry Cooder’s Never Make Your Move to Soon with Dryden playing his powder-blue Strat (one of three guitars the man from Stokesley had with him on the night), there would be more from Ryland Peter Cooder later. Much tittering at the

mention of Little Willie John, but full attention when Mo got the Fever…the man who had great success with Fever and Need Your Love So Bad could call himself whatever he damn-well liked! More Tex-Mex Ry Cooder (Across the Borderline), then SRV. Dave Dryden’s take on Stevie Ray Vaughan (and later Hendrix) is quite an experience. Striking out on Cold Shot with SRV’s trademark Texas shuffle this alone was worth the price of admission. The Mo Scott Christmas party wouldn’t be complete without a Muddy Waters’ number, so, we got Blow Wind Blow.

What followed was the blues highlight of the year. Red House, for ever associated with J. Hendrix, featured Dryden’s brilliant guitar playing and Mo’s frenzied Come on! exaltation. Hendrix at his best (the absence of psychedelia), Dryden a master musician. Long before the end of the one hour first set they were up partying dancing to Mo Scott’s fast-paced selection of tunes, Knock on Wood and many other dance floor fillers keeping them on their feet.

An interval festive feast, a raffle (!), and an unexpected bonus downstairs as Julija Jacenaite sang a few tunes, simply for her own satisfaction, once more accompanied by pianist Alan Law (a short review of their earlier set is appended to this posting).

Mo loves Ray Charles so Let the Good Times Roll kept the party going as the second set got under way. The Neville Brothers, Bonnie Raitt (River of Tears), then more SRV. Pride and Joy, oh yes! A truly magnificent version of Vaughan’s signature tune. Mo Scott – she’s our pride and joy. Vocalist, bandleader, raffle meister, Scott took a breather as the boys launched into an ostensibly unusual, if not incongruous, choice of material. Billy Cobham’s high-energy jazz-fusion workout Red Baron hit new heights of virtuosity; Dryden shredding with taste (an oxymoron?), Harland, a towering funking presence, Smith’s killing snap on the snare.

Middle period Stones (Miss You), King Floyd (that’s King, not Pink), All Along the Watchtower (Jimi Hendrix’s version) produced more brilliant guitar playing from Dryden, Mo was clearly enjoying it all as she called out to Sonny Boy, Help Me. It was fast approaching midnight but the audience wasn’t going to let Mo go without an encore. The Empress of the Blues took it home on Route 66.

Julija Jacenaite (vocals) & Alan Law (piano)

Earlier in the evening in the Jazz Café’s downstairs bar Lithuanian-born, Tyneside-resident vocalist Julija Jacenaite selected a few standards to sing accompanied at the piano by Alan Law. Misty with Jacenaite wringing out every last drop of emotion, a rollercoaster Love Me or Leave Me, a lengthy, note-filled take on One Note Samba, then due to a slightly late start to their set, Jacenaite and Alan Law concluded matters with JJ’s ever-expressive rendition of Angel Eyes.

During the interval of Mo Scott’s gig a trip to the downstairs bar found Jacenaite and Law playing to a couple of barflies. Two numbers were heard during the interval; first, All of Me then an interesting arrangement of Mood Indigo.                  
Russell

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance