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Bebop Spoken There

Sting: "It was great. They [the River City Jazzmen] all wore blue suits. The band had been together for about twenty years, which was the same age as the suits." - (Melody Maker Sept. 22, 1979).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday October 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see centre column).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 3:00pm/5:30pm. Screening of Stanley Nelson's documentary film (2019, cert. 15, 1hr 55mins).

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Millstone.

Fred Rowe (tpt.vcl); Barry Soulsby (clt/vcl); Laurence McBriarty (tmb); Brian Bennett (bjo/vcl); Brian Sibbald (bs); Fred Thompson (dms.vcl).
(Review by Lance.)
It was good to hear the VCJ again - it had been a while - and I'm pleased to say that the slings and arrow that are occasionally thrown their way have not affected their enthusiasm and indeed skill. They have never strayed away from the dictum that jazz is entertainment and entertain they certainly do.
As I bellied up to the bar to order a pint of Doom Bar Bitter - one of several real ales on offer - the band were looking back at the old Skiffle days with Worried Man Blues. Indeed with the recent drastic cuts in Arts Council Funding there must be a lot of worried men and women singing a worried song - let's hope they won't be worried long!
Fortunately, bands such as the VCJ aren't in the funding scuffle - their music is much too happy for that!
Fred Rowe sang of Miss Magnolia's Wedding Day, Fred Thompson crooned Buddy Bolden's Blues and I ordered a Cumberland Feast. This comprised; Cumberland Sausage, Fried Egg, Chips, Peas and a Boat of Gravy. 
Milenberg Joys, I Get The Blues When It Rains - Soulsby and Rowe doing the vocal - Rowe made like The Schnozz (Jimmy Durante - ask your ma!) on Inka, Dinka Do (They don't write them like that any more!) and I anticipated my Cumberland Feast.
The set finished with Soulsby singing Ace in the Hole and I licked my lips at the thought of my Cumberland Feast. I wondered if they'd had to send to Cumbria for it?
The barmaid approached - she had an apologetic look on her face.
There'd been a breakdown in communication and my order had been lost. However, it was now being processed (cooked) and would I like a drink on the house?
I said that I thought that a splendid idea and another pint of Doom Bar more than made up for the wait and I have to say that when the Feast did arrive it was as fine a piece of Cumberland Sausage that I have tasted outside of Cumbria. Full marks for food and customer relations.
Back on the bandstand Soulsby was singing Everybody Loves My Baby (was it Billy Harper or Eddie Thompson? who used to call it - Every Baby Loves My Body?), he then played Stranger on the Shore - it was a request, like The Saints, it always is!
Fred Thompson sang At The Jazz Band Ball - substituting his own words for Johnny Mercer's! They were ok. Barry and Fred sang Shine and Ann Alex remarked on how subversive the lyrics were!
I guess you have to treat them in the context of the time when the song was written (1910)
Fred Rowe sang I'm Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover which he'd re-written as I'm Getting Over The Worst Hangover That I've Ever Had Before! Good Time Jazz - no other way to describe it and, although I've concentrated on the vocals the solos and the ensembles were first class.
A visit to The Millstone is worthwhile.
Lance.

1 comment :

Ann Alex said...

About those lyrics to 'Shine'. I hadn't noticed them before but I guess the song is highly ironic, and refers to the problems that black Americans had. For instance black musicians weren't allowed to play in certain venues under colour bar rules.
Anyway I thoroughly enjoyed this gig.
Ann Alex

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance