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Bebop Spoken There

Jeremy Pelt: "It [Birth of the Cool sessions] was bebop in sheep's clothing." - (DownBeat, December 2019).

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Today Tuesday November 12

Afternoon

Jazz

Classic Swing - The Ship Inn, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 0191 251 3677. 1:00pm - 3:00pm. Free.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 1:15pm. Stanley Nelson's 2019 documentary film.

Evening

Jazz

Not Now Charlie - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB.Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

Blues

Sugaray Rayford - Cluny, Lime St., Newcastle NE1 2PQ. Tel 0191 230 4474. 8:00pm. £15.00.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, November 03, 2012

Tell us about the first time and how it was for you...

We review gigs and CDs. We list and preview gigs as well as announcing births, deaths and marriages. It's a good format and keeps our community informed.
However, I think it would be even better to have some more general pieces from within our readers' own area of jazz.
Examples; Some words about your favourite band, memories of venues past and present, a particular musician singer whose discs mean something to you - in fact anything to run alongside the reviews and previews which of course will remain our staple diet - in fact what I want are your opinions and your memories.
I would like you to recall hearing legends either before or after they became a legend. A memory of your first concert, your first record, your first jazz club, your first playing gig, your first... Anything jazz related. For example, when I received my first pay packet I immediately bought Glenn Miller's In The Mood on 78rpm.
I have moved on since then but it remains in my collection numbered 1A.
You've got the picture I guess so let's have these things recorded for posterity.
Lance.
PS: This invitation is worldwide!

3 comments :

Anonymous said...

I got into jazz via 1960s Brit R&B bands then American artists such as Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Muddy Waters. I got to like folk blues and boogie woogie piano from this source. Then a friend and colleague at the office where I had started work turned out to be a very good blues and boogie pianist. His name was Bob Hogg - he was married to local session guitarist Charlie Smith's daughter. Bob introduced me to Peterson's iconic 'Night Train' album. That was it - hooked! I just about wore out the album. Honey Dripper, Hymn to Freedom, Georgia on my mind etc. - all superb tracks with his great trio with Ray Brown and Ed Thigpen.
Roly

Anonymous said...

I was brought up in a house full of music...from Fats Waller to Stan Kenton. Stan Kenton got my attention!
...and Woody Herman.
Keen and Peachy and The Four Brothers on the other side of the wax 78.
I was about twelve years old and very impressionable. First I was going to be a trombone player then a drummer followed by trumpet. I ended up a saxophone player...The Four Brothers saw to that!
And about six years later Johnny Griffin at Ronnie Scott's led me to a lifelong battle with the tenor sax.
I've seen and heard a lot of great players over the years and it's impossible to pick out a favorite.
If you ever saw, and heard, Jazz At The Phil "live", you'd know what I mean!

Anonymous said...

The first jazz gig I remember was the Duke Ellington Band - I thought it was September 1972, but the online references to Ellington playing Hammersmith Odeon in the 1970s make it October 1971! I was 12 (or 11...).

My brother and I were taken by our father, a jazz fan. I don't rember much, aside from a clear image of Paul Gonsalves soloing in a bright spotlight.

In the interval, we were taken to a nearby pub, where all the band had gathered: my father introduced us to the musicians - but I have no idea who was there!

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance