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Bebop Spoken There

Grant Green Jr.: "One thing that most people--especially jazz cats--don't realise is that all of your jazz standards were once pop standards" - DownBeat July 2018).

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Bobby Sanabria: "Tito Puente was not a very tall man, but when he played the timbales he was a giant among men." - DownBeat July 2018).

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Today Tuesday June 19

Afternoon

Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.

Evening

Jam session - Jazz Café, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. Tel: 0191 222 9882. 8:00pm. Free. Stu Collingwood, Paul Grainger, Matt MacKellar.

Mark Williams Trio - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB. Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, December 08, 2017

The Improvisers' Workshop Ensemble - “Magic Mirrors" @ The Jazz Café - December 1

Nigel of Coalburns (Voice & Toys) / Gabriele Heller (Voice & Objects) / John Harrison (Saxophone) / Thomas Dixon (Saxophone) / Karen Rann (Saxophone) / Crispian Heath (Acoustic Guitar) / Martin Donkin (Electric Guitar) / Paul Taylor (Keyboards) Tobias lllingworth (Keyboards and other instrumentation) / Wesley Stephenson (Drums and Percussion)
(Review/photo by Ken Drew).
“Gathering monthly for sessions at The Bridge Hotel 'The Improvisers' Workshop' is a space where people interested in sound and improvisation gather to play, discuss and explore the nature and mysteries of improvisation. These sessions often result in different games and strategies used as vehicles for the improvisation that takes place. "Magic Mirrors" was such an idea that was conceived for a performance by the ensemble.
As a durational piece “Magic Mirrors” explores the space where a large group ensemble works in unison, and the way that unity dissolves and breaks into smaller groupings of players or soloists, which may also be symbolised by silence. Through mirroring and a Chinese whispers style of communication, the growth of the music is shaped by the decisions of the players and the way they choose to mirror, this could be rhythmically, tonally, texturally, emotionally or any such inspiration of their own choosing.”
Part 1:    A quiet start, building on individual notes & timbres, nicely demonstrating the use of voices as instruments, then building to include all performers. The rhythm of the piece changing many times, from steady to percussive single beats. Then it slowed to a more contemplative section, with the sounds of wafted paper ('other devices') taking over from voice. Then into a longer section of disparate sounds including vocal utterances from Coalburns, and wailing saxes. The piece continued to develop around the group where you could detect the flow of ideas being passed around. Pleasantly quiet ending, with keys (lllingworth) and small bells gently struck by Coalburns.

Part 2: This was a longer piece, introduced by shimmering notes on the keys (Taylor this time) and gentle sax (Harrison initially, then Dixon). Initially more meandering, but developing with the addition of voices and soprano sax. In fact getting quite heated as more voicings joined in, Heller in particular becoming quite frantic with vocal exclamations. The small bells rang and brought in a quiet section which heralded the introduction of a wide range of pitches and timbres from all. Then to close, the keys brought in a mellow flute-like tone to gracefully fade. This piece certainly explored the sonorous nature of a range of instruments, and their interaction, whilst still flowing as a single improvised piece.

Part 3:  Starting with a profound drum beat initiated by Stephenson, with saxes and voices joining in, this quickly became quite an energetic piece with all contributing. At one point it took on an almost marching-band funky rhythm, but only fleetingly. Then back to a quiet section, with Coalburns adding vocal effects sounding as if the wind were gusting outside, or maybe you were overhearing just the bass tones of a distant conversation.  No matter, a distinctly odd sound, but one which held the piece together as the others continued to exchange and interpret sonic ideas.  Heller and Rann then struck up such a conversation, taken further by Rann and Harrison to close the piece.

Overall, this was a good demonstration of live improvisation. Of the 3 pieces, I had no particular favourite, as they each flowed differently, yet each stood alone in their own right. I was actually struck by how different these pieces were, given the short pause between them giving time to ‘regroup’ their thoughts and start again from pure silence.   This performance was appreciated by the assembled audience, and a good advert for the output of the monthly Improv Workshops held by JNE at the Bridge.
Ken

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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Lance

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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