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Bebop Spoken There

Jim Hall: "Won't play loud, can't play fast" - (From one of the great guitarist's business cards brought to our attention by Roly Veitch).

Joel Harrison: “It’s incredibly hard to play bebop on guitar, harder than on saxophone.” – (Jazz Times August 2015)

Today Tuesday June 27

Evening
CANCELLED! Atlas - Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8:15pm. £10/£8 (conc.). JNE 'Women Make Music'.
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Charles Gordon (solo piano) - Redwood Bar, Vermont Hotel, Newcastle. 10pm - midnight. Free.
Maine Street Jazzmen - British Legion Club, West Jesmond Ave., Newcastle NE2 3EX. 8:30pm. £5.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Musivate Predicts the Ukulele Could Transform the Face of Corporate Team Building

Music may factor in very few board meetings but it could be a new and crucial ingredient to corporate success according to one teacher who is setting out to change the face of team building forever.
Ukulele teacher, Lorraine Bow has taught several thousand people to play the Hawaiian instrument, including TV presenters Ant and Dec. She founded Musivate to bring people together through music, reasoning that those who make music together cannot be enemies.
Ms Bow said, “Team building as a concept is an incredible tool for managers and stakeholders looking to motivate staff, build closer bonds between colleagues and increase collaboration, productivity and ultimately profitability. But, many CEOs and employees alike feel a sense of dread at the very mention of the word.”
Musivate’s use of the Uke to bring corporate teams together is totally unique. Already finding favour with household names like Google, Comic Relief and the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games, Musivate is helping brands around the country realise that there is a new, more modern face to team building.
“We’re determined to challenge the outdated notions of team building and have created a truly enjoyable, proven method of building teams using the Uke – it is a novel approach and a marked departure from traditional exercises but the results are genuinely exceptional,” added Bow. “Learning to play an instrument such as the Ukulele is fun and inclusive. It’s a really enjoyable way to spend time and engages participants like few other forms of team building do.”
Easier than most instruments to learn, Ukulele team building participants can be making music together in one hour, giving an immediate return and sense of achievement. The skills learned relate back to the work environment and can help create a more sharing culture of enjoyment that also performs a purpose.
The string instrument actually disguises a range of team building powers. In each Musivate session, the use of the Ukulele means that participants have to listen to each other and work together. The act of music learning also stimulates creativity and can help to break down barriers. By the end of the session, participants are able to play at least one song and can receive a music video to keep the community and team spirit alive long after the event itself.
Musivate have also turned their concept into conference icebreakers and refreshers. Acting as an unexpected and fun way to break up the day, a Ukulele icebreaker or refresher can keep delegates on their toes between presentations and key note speeches, ensuring everyone is involved and paying attention to get the most from the day.
Ms Bow said, “It's always difficult for conference organisers and event managers to keep the attention of their audience and ensure that delegates are absorbing and retaining information. Musivate helps out with a short burst of musical activity that can serve to break the ice with new colleagues or distant colleagues, banishing awkward small talk from the day. The change of pace can also reenergize attendees and help them to refocus so they get more from the main event.”
To find out more, visit http://www.musivate.com

2 comments :

  1. So Lance,
    when can our team of writers on this blog begin our ukelele lessons for team building, or would you prefer us to use banjos?

    ReplyDelete

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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