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Bebop Spoken There

Jennifer Wharton: "People forget that the trombone is so glorious. It can be like going to church, or getting ready for battle. It can be a lot of things....For a longtime I was the only female trombonist in New York," - (DownBeat May 2021)

Archive quotes.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Postage

13,218 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 637 of them this year alone and, so far, 45 this month (May 11).

Coming soon ...



May 20: Vieux Carré Jazzmen at The Holystone (Indoors!)
May 20 Maine Street Jazzmen are back at Sunniside Social Club.
May 23: Vieux Carré Hot Four are back at The Spanish City.

June 21: Jazz in the Afternoon are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club. (Revised date).
June 23: Vieux Carré Jazzmen are back at Cullercoats Crescent Club. (Revised date).

Sunday, May 04, 2014

PG Allstars @ Salsa, May 3

Paul Gowland (ten/alt), Pete Gilligan (pno), Ray Truscott (bs), Steve Doyle (dms)
(Review/photo by Dave Parker)
This was mainstream jazz of the highest quality – as good as anything you might hear in a top London club, but this was Saturday night in a small bar on Westgate Road and free admission.  Geordie jazz lovers are lucky.
The PG Allstars played standards but Gowland and Gilligan made them sound like originals.  They reworked the harmony on the classic ballad In a Sentimental Mood so it was less sugar and more spice.  Gowland played the head of Bye Bye Blackbird as though he’d just made it up with only an occasional snatch of the original melody.
Midnight Voyage lived up to its name: Gowland’s dreamy tenor took us to far away places and then back again with a brief echo of the melody before handing over to Gilligan whose haunting solo was equally transporting and then Truscott continued the mood with a lyrical journey through the entire range of his six-string bass.
Next was Take Five, the most familiar jazz tune which Gowland, on alto, made sound as fresh and extraordinary as when it was first played over 50 years ago.  Gilligan and Truscott kept the 5/4 rhythm nailed down while Doyle rolled all over the kit.
No point in mentioning every number – they were all brilliant.
Dave P.

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