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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Gelly: “From 1 January 1920, when prohibition was imposed in the US, people didn’t stop drinking, they just stopped drinking legally.” – (Jazz Journal October 2017).

Regina Carter: “When I was a teenager, I would daydream about going out on a date and dancing to Ella’s music.” (Down Beat October 2017).

Today Monday November 20

Afternoon

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 NE30 4QS. 1:00pm. Free.

Classic Swing - Marquis of Granby, Streetgate, Sunniside NE16 5ES. Tel: 0191 488 0954. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

Interview with Jane Monheit

(Interview by Lance)
BSH: Hello Jane, lovely to know you'll soon be back with us and looking forward to hearing you again in the UK. I'm going to ask you a question you must have heard many times -Who inspired you in your early days before you developed this distinct, identifiable style you have now?
JM: Most of the great jazz singers have influenced me in one way or another, and many of the great musical theater singers have as well. I'd say the strongest influences were Ella Fitzgerald and Judy Garland.
BSH: You've got a new album out,  The Heart of the Matter. It’s a change of direction for you, is that right?
JM: Not really. I've always recorded a lot of non-standard repertoire, starting with my second album in 2001. I've also worked with Gil before, and nearly all of the musicians involved, including my touring trio which is featured heavily on the album. All of my albums have a slight shift in the vibe while retaining my musical core and highlighting my strongest values as a musician…this one shifts contemporary, but it's still very much a Jane record.

BSH: The number of women jazz singers seems to multiply each year. Even going way back, the women singers have always outnumbered the men. Do you think it’s possibly because women can express the raw emotions of unrequited love, rejection better than men? – you know the ‘a man ain’t supposed to cry’ syndrome.
JM: I don't think that's necessarily why…I think a record company may be more likely to market a female because of the obvious aesthetic there. It's much easier to make money off of a female artist with a sexy image, whether real or created. The male singers exist, they just are signed and marketed a little more rarely than the women. And when they are, we usually end up with a lot of Sinatra clones, because that's easily marketable as well. It's a business, after all. Of course, now, in the internet age, there are so many other ways to discover great new artists now…we don't have to just buy what's aggressively sold to us. I think we'll see more of a balance in the coming years because of that, including a more diverse range of artists becoming successful. It's already happening.

BSH: You have such a rich rounded voice it suggests a classical background…
JM: I have no classical voice background. Good training is good training regardless of genre.

BSH: I note clarinet listed amongst your attributes. Do you still play it?
JM: No. An emphatic no.

BSH: I came across a live set on YouTube of you singing with the Les Paul Trio at the Iridium in New York. That must have been a rare experience.
JM: I play with them all the time. Les passed away several years ago; the remaining trio still plays the gig and I sit in occasionally. It's just a regular NY thing, really.

BSH: You have your husband,  Rick Montalbano Jr. on drums. This obviously must work but are there not occasions when domestic matters effect your professional relationship? I know some musicians who need the space a gig gives them to get away from their partner!
JM: Seriously, everyone seems to want me to say there is drama in my marriage because we work together. I've been asked this literally countless times. My marriage is solid as a rock, onstage and off, and if it wasn't that's no one's business either!! We play together because we're a good musical match, not because we're married.

BSH: Where are you off to after your London dates?
JM: Home to NYC for a run at the Blue Note, one of our homes away from home. We always have a wonderful time there.

BSH: Thank you Jane I’ll look forward to catching one of your shows.

JM: Thanks and see you then!
Lance.

1 comment :

LIz said...

enjoyed that Lance, well done, you sure do get around!
Liz

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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