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Bebop Spoken There

Fergus McCreadie: "I think a lot of the best music is very political, and there are so many things going on in the world that I'm constantly angry at. But for me making music is not the space for that" (Jazzwise July 2022)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.
Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST! -- Holly Cooper:"Lance writes pull quotes like no one else!"

Postage

14336 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 14 years ago. 555 of them this year alone and, so far, 55 this month (June 19).

From This Moment On ...

June

Sat 25-Sun 26: Harambee Pasadia Festival @ The Hub, Shaw Bank, Barnard Castle DL12 8TD. www.harambeepasadiafestival.com. Line-up inc. Kevin Haynes Groupo Elegua, Hannabiell & the Midnight Blue Collective, Knats. Tickets from £20.00. adult, £10.00. teen (12-17).
Sat 25: Wild Women of Wylam @ Daniel Farm, Wylam. 7:00pm. £20.00. (inc. food).
Sat 25: Julija Jacenaite @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Sun 26 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 26: Musicians Unlimited @ Jackson’s Wharf, Hartlepool. 1:00pm. Outdoor (indoor if inclement weather).
Sun 26: Mississippi Dreamboats @ Springwell Village Community Venue, Gateshead. 2:30pm. A ‘1940s’ Weekend’ event (from 1:00pm).
Sun 26: More Jam @ The Globe, Newcastle. 3:00pm. Free.
Sun 26: Foundry Jazz Ensemble @ The Exchange, North Shields. 3:00pm.
Sun 26: Los Chichanos @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm. £10.00 adv., £12.00. door.

Mon 27: Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

Tue 28: Jam session @ Black Swan, Newcastle. 7:30pm. House trio: Dean Stockdale, Paul Grainger, Sid White.

Wed 29: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 29: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 29: Four @ The Exchange, North Shields. 7:00pm.
Wed 29: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.

Thu 30: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, North Tyneside. 1:00pm.
Thu 30: 58 Jazz Collective @ Hops & Cheese, Hartlepool. 7:30pm.
Thu 30: Lights Out By Nine @ Hoochie Coochie, Newcastle. 8:30pm. Free.
Thu 30: Maine Street Jazzmen @ Sunniside Social Club, Gateshead. 8:30pm.
Thu 30: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman’s Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm.

July

Fri 01: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Fri 01: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm. £5.00.
Fri 01: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms, Monkseaton. 1:00pm.
Fri 01: Swing Manouche @ The Vault, Hexham. 7:30pm (doors). £20.00.
Fri 01: 1920s Speakeasy w live jazz @ The Exchange, North Shields. 8:00pm. A Blues, Jazz & Swing Festival event.
Fri 01: Struggle Buggy @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. Blind Pig Blues Club. 8:00pm.

Sat 02: Hot Fingers @ St Augustine’s Parish Centre, Darlington. 12:30pm. £10.00.
Sat 02: Play Jazz! workshop @ The Globe, Newcastle. 1:30pm. Tutor Steve Glendinning: Latin jazz. £25.00. Enrol at: www.jazz.coop.
Sat 02: Talk: Storytelling & jazz as an expression of urban life @ The Exchange, North Shields. 1:45pm. A Blues, Jazz & Swing Festival event.
Sat 02: The Commandments + On Parole @ The Exchange, North Shields. 2:30pm. A Blues, Jazz & Swing Festival event. Rhythm & blues.
Sat 02: Geordie Jazz Man @ The Exchange, North Shields. 5:30pm. A Blues, Jazz & Swing Festival event. Screening of Abi Lewis’ documentary film about Keith Crombie & the Jazz Café.
Sat 02: The Delta Prophets Trio @ The Exchange, North Shields. 6:30pm. A Blues, Jazz & Swing Festival event. Rhythm & blues.
Sat 02: Swing Manouche @ Claypath Deli, Durham. 7:00pm.
Sat 02: Swung Eight & King Bees @ The Exchange, North Shields. 7:30pm. A Blues, Jazz & Swing Festival event. Swing dance + ace Chicago blues band.
Sat 02: Tyne Valley Big Band @ Greenside Community Centre, Ryton. 7:30pm.
Sat 02: Patrick Cromb @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Sunday, October 11, 2020

Film preview: "Ronnie's"


If you profess to be a jazz fan and haven't been to Ronnie Scott's at least once in your lifetime  then your street cred is questionable and if you have been only once then your cred is open to even further investigation as Ronnie's isn't a one off drop in place unless you're from the Antipodes or maybe Mars and even then the chances are you will be back.

It's that kind of place.

If you doubt my word then check out a new documentary that's about to premiere on Friday Oct. 23 on the Everyman Cinema circuit - God and Boris permitting.

It's probably the best factual jazz film since Jazz on a Summer's Day and, over the years, most of the artists who appeared in that film have, along with just about every other great jazz musician, performed at Ronnie Scott's. Many of them can be seen and heard via rare archived footage, during the course of the film

It relates the story of the club and its founders, Pete King and Ronnie Scott, who set out to bring the atmosphere of the modern jazz clubs on New York's 52nd St. to London's Soho. First on Gerrard St and then at it's current location in Frith St. However, readers of BSH will know all this so let's cut to the film.

Written and directed by Oliver Murray it's a compelling story of a man and his dream. A dream that came true and continues to this day 20 years after his death. Of course Ronnie Scott was more than just a club owner he was also one of the great British tenor saxophone players. That too is an important part of the story.

To list the who's who of artists seen and heard on the film is near impossible however, the IMDb listing below provides that information and more - much more. 

Put October 23 in your diary now - underline the entry, put it in bold CAPITAL LETTERS. Fingers crossed, it's not to be missed!

Lance

Trailer.

IMDb link.

2 comments :

Dave said...

I’ve only been once and wasn’t impressed. I’ve always been annoyed by the way Ronnies distorts jazz in this country. It’s too small, yet attracts the biggest names so then it has to overcharge for tickets. I suspect that half the audience are journalists on freebies and they’re not going to complain, are they? That also bumps up the prices. When you add on at least a 100 quid for travel and accommodation it’s even less affordable for those of us in the North East. I’d rather be at Sage 2, the Lit and Phil or the Bridge and leave Ronnies to the southerners and their funny ways.
Cheers
Dave

Anonymous said...

One reason for the two different views of Ronnie Scott's club is that in fact there are two 'Ronnie's' (not to be confused with 'the' two Ronnies). Ronnie the First is now a mythical place but it did actually exist in the old days where you could get in for free if you arrived at 9pm when it opened and could stay until 3am listening to the best jazz musicians in the world. Two impecunious Dublin teenagers, myself and my jazz-loving mate, Bren thought nothing of getting the bus down to Dun Laoghaire to catch the overnight mail boat to Holyhead and then an assortment of trains to London and tube to Leicester Square to get to Ronnie the First. The first time we went we, of course, arrived at 9pm and bagged a front row table and heard three staggeringly good sets by Ben Webster until 3am. And we were left completely undisturbed by management or staff even though we could just afford a coke each at what seemed then the extortionate price of half a crown a glass. What made the experience even more memorable was that Ronnie Scott himself was the compere and in the flesh he was even funnier than in his hilarious autobiography 'Some of My Best Friends Are Blues'.
Our accommodation that night was in what could only be described as a doss house in Covent Garden.
Since that time anyone who risked travelling with me through London ended up in Ronnie the First unless they were deaf or had a certificate proving they would turn into a pumpkin if they were out after midnight.

What the previous commentator needs to realise is that without the dedication of Ronnie Scott (and Pete King) in bringing over established US jazz giants and having a club where they could play, in the early days we wouldn't have been able to hear these people live as there was no reciprocal arrangement for musicians from the US to play in the UK, and vice versa.

However, my guess is that he actually visited Ronnie the Second which came into being when Pete King sold the club in 2005 (Ronnie Scott had died some years earlier). It is true that the prices are much more expensive and the atmosphere inside is not nearly as good but, too be fair, the club does still get very high quality musician and you can experience them in a 'club' setting (rather than the concert hall set-up of the Sage, for instance). However the biggest changes for me are that it is now much more 'corporate' and having two sessions each evening means you can just hear one set of the main artist/band. Some of these changes are, of course, inevitable in our financialised world and it is obviously expensive to run a club in a city like London so it is still great that Ronnie the Second exists even if some of us pine for Ronnie the First (but I would now be happy to give the doss house a miss).

JC

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