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Friday, October 23, 2015

Tutors Live! @ Sage Gateshead – October 21

(Review by Russell)
Tutors working on the BA/BMus degree course based at Sage Gateshead performed to an audience of ‘freshers’ – the ‘Class of 2018’. The new student intake arrived on time, most of them with phones switched off, ready to listen. Hall Two’s cabaret table layout made it an informal occasion. What would the new lot make of it all?
A degree at Sage Gateshead prepares young musicians for a working life in music: jazz to popular music, to the commercial to music technology. On stage a roll call of the region’s teaching talent demonstrated no nonsense performance skills. 
On time, set up, ready to go to work. Mouthful gave it some. Opening a cappella, the quartet’s numbers illustrated an amazing vocal range. Mr Peabody’s Coal Train to Well, Well, Well to Lou Reed, students sat transfixed, impressed. The quartet: Bex Mather, Katherine Zeserson, Dave Camlin and Sharon Durant. Later Mather and Camlin picked up guitars and introduced Bethany Elen-Coyle (vocals) and Fender bass man Paul Susans walked on to near hysteria! The man has clearly proved a hit with the students. Dave Camlin jokingly called for calm.
During the interval the student audience made a bee-line for the bar. This essential aspect of student life would appear to be to taken seriously.
Second set. The students returned, some with drinks in hand. On stage there was a change of guard as the jazz boys sauntered out. Rod Sinclair said hello. A Night in Tunisia said a big hello to the freshers – this is what we do! Sinclair, with Telecaster in hand, shared the stage with A-listers: Paul Edis (pictured), keyboards, Ian Paterson, bass and the percussion duo of Roger Hempsall and Adam Sinclair. City Strut heard Sinclair, R, strip paint, the rhythm section relentless. On walked Ruth Lambert. A vocal master class: No Moon at All and Love Me Like a Man (Sinclair’s Strat did the job). Ms Lambert departed. Ballad time: In a Sentimental Mood. Paul Edis introduced two of his own compositions: Murmurations (Sinclair, A, swopped percussion for kit for some brush work, Hempsall on percussion) and Narrow Escape. The latter number, with Sinclair once again on percussion, featured a fierce duel with Mr Hempsall. The student audience loved it. Whoops and hollers! Mouthful joined the band, as did Hayley Jenkins playing alto alongside Edis (alto) for a dancing finale on A Message for You, Rudy and Primal Scream’s Movin’ On Up.
Russell.           

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