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12,535 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 12 years ago. 254 of them this year alone and, so far, 105 this month (Feb. 24).

Sunday, October 25, 2015

Charles Gordon & Kenny Hewitt @ The Jazz Café – October 24

Charles Gordon (keyboards & vocals) & Kenny Hewitt (tenor & soprano saxophones)
(Review by Russell)
Seats were at a premium this busy Saturday night. The Jazz Café did good business early on and it stayed that way. From one week to the next there’s no guessing as to how many people will turn up. Perhaps the prospect of an extra hour in bed (British ‘Summer’ Time ended at 2:00am – did anyone notice a seasonal change?) persuaded some to venture out.
Charles Gordon’s keyboards set-up dwarfed Kenny Hewitt’s low maintenance set-up of a saxophone in hand, another to one side, and a music stand. As one would expect of a long established working duo they started right on time. Spooky and Little Sunflower and some Sting suggested this would be an evening of jazz standards and familiar pop material. The introduction of one or two of Gordon’s compositions added an unexpected dimension. As the pianist’s liking for jazz-pop material is well known, his chosen subject matter came as something of a surprise: D Day and Burning in Burma ranged across global conflict and a never-ending litany of man’s inhumanity to man.
Keyboards and reeds is an established format, well within the capabilities of both Charles Gordon and Kenny Hewitt. It was, therefore, disappointing that the pianist didn’t play the Jazz Café’s upright piano, preferring to distract the listener with the frequent use of drum backing tracks. The venue’s Saturday evening stripped-down duo format offered them the opportunity to stretch out, yet, for the most part, they restrained themselves. This was, for some, a source of frustration. Only occasionally did Hewitt reveal that lurking within is a tenor player of considerable power awaiting emancipation.   
An enjoyable evening concluded with a disturbing, bizarre tale of someone (Mr Gordon?) shouting dementedly: Show me your dog…I wanna kill your dog tonight. Keep taking the medication! 
Photos.
(Russell)    

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