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Bebop Spoken There

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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.
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Born This Day
Louis Armstrong and Steve Andrews.

Sunday, May 05, 2013

Tim Kliphuis Trio - The Gypsy Seasons @ The Sage. May 4, 2013

Tim Kliphuis (violin), Nigel Clark (guitar) & Roy Percy (double bass)
(Review by Russell)
The Sage Gateshead’s Fiddles on Fire publicity stated the whole building comes alive with fiddle music representing a huge variety of styles and traditions. The festival’s opening concert featured the north east’s own world class orchestra - the Northern Sinfonia led by fiddler Bradley Creswick - followed by a whistle stop weekend circumnavigation of the fiddler’s globe. Performances and workshops claimed every available space throughout the Sage leaving little room for the exercising of a fiddler’s elbow! Musical postcards arrived from Asia, the Americas, Scandinavia, Europe and the Celtic nations.
Violinist Tim Kliphuis arrived in Gateshead minus his luggage. The Dutchman believed his suitcase was stuck on a ceilidh carousel at Schiphol Airport going round and round and round (waltz time?) longing to be partnered by a frantic fiddler. With a number of festival commitments to fulfill - concerts and workshops - Kliphuis went shopping for a shirt. Tyneside is a shopper’s paradise (the Sage knows you Shop Til You Bop) and the violin virtuoso looked half-way presentable when he took to the stage in the Northern Rock Foundation Hall for a late night gig with regular British buddies Nigel Clark (guitar) and double bassist Roy Percy.
In forty five minutes (plus encore) the trio’s musical passports were stamped many times in far-off lands. The three of them stood together in close proximity (covering little more than a postage stamp) creating an intimacy illuminated by a single spotlight. Amplification was minimal (Clark and Percy), the objective being to achieve clarity of sound (New Orleans’ clarinetist Evan Christopher performed similarly in Hall Two a few years ago).
Dazzling string playing from Kliphuis (the acoustic Kliphuis) and Clark on Fats Waller’s Honeysuckle Rose set the jazz bar at world record heights. The great jazz violinists (Kliphuis, Djangologie’s Emma Fisk, Stephane Grappelli) share one thing in common - they do it with élan. It must be a visual thing. The Nearness of You maintained the American jazz groove until Vivaldi intervened and then we were off to South America to interpret Astor’s Dream (comp.Kliphuis). Nordic lands beckoned (Grieg’s Peer Gynt), the irresistible sweep of Aaron Copland’s North American canvas had the late-night audience stompin’ at a hoe down (Percy’s darn-good slap-bass) then, to catch our collective breath, the European classical cannon imposed a welcome stillness close to midnight.                               
Russell.

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