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Bebop Spoken There

Tony Fisher: In the heyday of that scene [the1960s] there were about 120 musicians in London who did everything and of course, if you made a mistake you were never called again." - (Jazz Journal online, 19 September 2019).

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Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

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COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

CD Review: Pat Metheny – Tap: John Zorn’s Book of Angels Vol 20

Pat Metheny (guitars, sitar, tiples, bass, keyboards, orchestrionics, electronics, bandoneon, perussion, flugelhorn), Antonio Sanchez (drums, percussion)
(Review by Les)
Back in the nineties, John Zorn wrote 500 tunes inspired by traditional Jewish music.  This became known as Book One of the two volume work that became known as The Masada BookBook Two consisted of 300 tunes and was written in three months.
Over the past eight years, the tunes from Book Two have been recorded as volumes of The Book of Angels by a number of world-class musicians.  Volume 20 is a selection of six pieces recorded by Pat Metheny, assisted by his oft percussionist Antonio Sanchez.
Metheny’s interpretation of the pieces chosen culminates in a very varied and rich body of work, although generally there’s a strong, Middle Eastern “common denominator” running throughout the album.
It’s hard to believe that Tap was recorded by one artist, such is the diversity of the individual pieces, both in terms of composition and instruments/soundscapes used; from the sitar-dominated opener of Mastema, to the obviously “acoustic-Metheny” of Albim, concluding with a piano/drum chaotic cacophony Hurmiz.  In between there’s wild, abstract, heavily-distorted guitar soloing, complex and very precise rhythms and melodies, spiced with sounds and scrapings of…who knows what.
Despite the diversity of the pieces, as a body of work it all hangs together remarkably well.  It’s not background music; it has to be listened to, and it’s far too complex to be able to take it all in in one listen.  I’ve been through it a number of times now and it continues to reveal itself further with each play.
Whilst there are times it’s obvious who the main protagonist is, this isn’t your average, run-of-the-mill Pat Metheny album.  That said, the playing oozes his class and quality from start to finish.
I like this album on a number of levels; from the standpoint of a (one time) guitarist, from the standpoint of being a fan of creative jazz and from the standpoint of occasionally wanting something very different to listen to, to clear and refresh a sometimes tired listening palette.
Invest some time with it at the outset and you’ll enjoy return visits forevermore.
Pat Methrny: Tap released May 21, 2013.
Les.

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