Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Tony Kofi: "I bought myself an alto saxophone and learned from mum's record collection Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Doris Day" - (Jazzwise April, 2020).

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Sunday, May 12, 2013

CD Review: Tatterdemalion Rachel Musson/Mark Sanders/Liam Noble


Rachel Musson (tenor & soprano saxophones), Mark Sanders (drums) & Liam Noble (keyboards)
(Review by Russell)
Tatterdemalion is a 2012 recording on the Babel Label. North East audiences are familiar with the work of free jazz drummer Mark Sanders (a frequent visitor to Tyneside) and pianist Liam Noble turns-up in a variety of contexts, most recently with Christine Tobin at the Gateshead International Jazz Festival. Schmazz regulars heard Rachel Musson at the Cluny some time ago and this CD release confirms her arrival on the improv scene. 
Seven tracks - the titles suggest a thematic structure (May Be a Silken Thread, Wheel, Spinning, The Blanket Feels Woolen) - link together musically; Noble’s electronic manipulations a welcome surprise, Sanders’ percussion battery alert to the adventures of keyboards and reeds, Musson’s braying tenor, Musson’s upper register filigree. Foghorn tenor opens the recording on May Be a Silken Thread inviting Noble to tamper with the voltage. Wheel features Musson in free-wheeling form with Sander’s signature sound ( the shredding of bells!) ringing-out. The Blue Man sees Musson switch to soprano as Sanders delves into his tool box, unearthing more bells, chains and wood blocks. On My Road casts Noble as manic manipulator, frantically shifting ground, failing to shake-off Musson’s taut, sustained upper register tenor assault. Spinning hears-out Musson’s protesting, disorientated saxophone, lost in a MC Esher echo chamber. The Blanket Feels Woolen is a quiet affair; Gamelan delicacy, breathy tenor, polite enquiry. The closing number - You Wear Your Colours and Move - is in stark contrast to the tumultuous opening tracks with its taut tenor slow movement. Tatterdemalion is available on Babel (BDV13115).              
Russell.               

No comments :

Blog Archive