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Bebop Spoken There

Aubrey Logan: "I chose trombone because trombone just kicks my ass, and I needed to do something that was hard" - (DownBeat June 2019).

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2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

The voting is open between now and May 31 to enable site visitors to nominate their choices in the various categories of this year's APPJAG awards which can be done here.
BSH was very proud to be nominated and to win the 2018 Media Award and hope we can have your support again this year.

Today Friday May 24

Afternoon

Jazz

Rendezvous Jazz - Monkseaton Arms, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. Tel: 0191 251 3928. 1:00pm. Free.

Giles Strong Trio - Bishop Auckland Town Hall, Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL14 7NP. Tel: 03000 269 524. 1:00pm. £5.00.

Evening.

Blues/Soul/Funk

Dave Kelly & Christine Collister - Gala Theatre & Cinema, Millennium Place, Durham DH1 1WA . Tel: 03000 266 600. 8:00pm. £18.00.

The Hookahs - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

Groove-a-matics - Lindisfarne Club, West St., Wallsend NE28 8LG. Tel: 0191 262 4258. 9:00pm.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, April 06, 2017

GIJF Day 3:John Pope Quintet @ Sage Gateshead - April 2

John Pope (bass), Jamie Stockbridge (alto), Faye  MacCalman   (tenor), Graham Hardy (pocket trumpet), Johnny Hunter (drums).
(Review by Steve T)
Having missed them at the Bridge last summer, this was a major fixture in the program for me, without which the Festival would likely have become two gigs over consecutive nights, which isn't that unusual at Sage Gateshead where I often spend three or four consecutive nights.
Coincidentally, Ornette Coleman's Shape of Jazz to Come is on number one son's listening list so, not having heard it for many years, I bought us each a copy. Like probably many others, I saw the great man in Sage One shortly after returning to the North East, which I expected to be an act of homage but was actually excellent, despite being younger and (even) less responsible - I think I may have nodded off during a pocket trumpet or violin part.
Although I wouldn't cite Ornette as an all-time favourite, I consider the initial breakthrough period as essential listening for any Jazz enthusiast with an interest in free, adventurous, innovative, challenging music - oh I'm sorry, I've just quoted Martin’s Listening to the Future by mistake (the Alan Barnes ones are the best).
It was a short set of just four pieces, including two from the aforementioned album, and a reminder of one of the great ironies and contradictions of Ornette, that he had a fantastic flair for melody.
Graham Hardy demonstrated why he's the first choice trumpet player for many in the North East. Jamie Stockbridge on alto was clearly an important component and rose to the challenge impeccably. Faye is at the forefront of TNG in North East Jazz, and Trekkies will know what that means and the rest may work it out - no passive reporting on BSH. She's a favourite of Jazz North East, (who did a splendid job putting the afternoon on), and you can hear why. Johnny Hunter on drums was a new name to me (I think and apologies if not) and I understand there's a Leeds or Manchester connection, but he could just as easily been dipped in the Tyne by his mam as a bairn, where we only produce top drawer drummers.
It's hard to think how anybody other than a sax player could lead a band dedicated to the music of Ornette, but there's no doubt at all who's in control of this, the horns watching him closely, providing a rock solid foundation with outstanding musicianship and stretching something already stretched beyond capacity into new musical terrain.
I missed a set I'd paid good money for to watch this and I'm satisfied it was a good call.
Steve T.

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