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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Carrick: "I contacted Max Jones of Melody Maker and offered to be his correspondent in the States, but I should have done what Ken Colyer had done, get a job on a ship and then jump ship in the States. So I didn't make it [to New Orleans] till 1973." - (Just Jazz May 1999)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Monday, February 17, 2020

CD Review: Jeff Rupert & George Garzone - The Ripple.

Jeff Rupert, George Garzone (tenor sax); Richard Drexler (piano); Jeremy Allen (bass); Marty Morell (drums).
(Review by Lance).

The two tenor line-up has long been a favourite of mine. How could it not be when you think of such legendary pairings as Wardell Gray & Dexter Gordon; Gene Ammons & Sonny Stitt; Sonny Stitt & Red Holloway - so amply demonstrated back at Newcastle's Corner House in the 1980s - Lockjaw and Johnny Griffin; Al and Zoot and, of course, the best of them all (said with nationalistic pride) The Jazz Couriers. Tubbs and Ronnie took the format to a new level and, if this  Stateside offering doesn't topple the champions they come within the tip of a Rico number 2 reed of doing it!

Dedicated to Lester Young who influenced so many modern tenor men -  paradoxically Sonny Rollins took the Hawkins route - this is a fine tribute. Both players have an individual sound and, I suspect that it is Rupert who has the marginally lighter sound but I could be wrong! Rupert is featured on his own Beauty Becomes Her whilst Garzone is featured on The Shadow of your Smile.

This is Lester via Getz, this is Lester via Zoot, this is Lester's legacy in the language of today's jazz, as I see it, scene.

The two horns may have top billing but, Drexler on piano is of equal stature with some amazing solos and Allen and Morell underpin the whole shebang. I close my eyes, turn the volume up and it's hard not to believe I'm sitting in a NYC 52nd St. club back in the day. Even though it's a studio recording there is a live feeling to it. All that is missing is the the background noise of someone ordering a pastrami on rye sandwich. Maybe if I turn the volume up next door will provide some background noise, they usually do when I'm practising but, then again, I'm not Jeff Rupert or George Garzone!

Next stop the car stereo - the ultimate accolade for a review CD.
Lance.

Bahia; Go-Go; Stardust; Without a Song; The Shadow of Your Smile; Detour Ahead; The Red Door; Red Top; Hoboken; Beauty Becomes Her; Lester Left Town; Alone Together.

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