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Bebop Spoken There

Jazzmeia Horn: "Sometimes my grandmother visits me in my dreams when I feel like I want to give up or I'm too tired, just for inspiration and encouragement." - (Jazzwise, Dec., Jan., 2019/20).

Archive

Today Thursday December 5

Afternoon

Jazz

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Road, Holystone NE27 0DA. Tel: 0191 266 6173. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jazz

Maine Street Jazzmen - Sunniside Social Club, Hollywell Lane, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5NJ. Tel: 0191 488 7347. 8:30pm. Free.

Tees Hot Club w. Middlesbrough Jazz & Blues Orchestra - Dorman’s Club, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Tel: 01642 823813. 8:30pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees TS18 4AW. 8:30pm. £2.50.

Blues/Soul/Funk/Etc.

Jools Holland’s R&B Orchestra - Newcastle City Hall, Northumberland Road, Newcastle NE1 8SF. Tel: 0844 8112121. 7:30pm. £47.50. & £34.00. Second night of two.

Chris Farlowe & the Norman Beaker Band + Teresa Watson Band - Newcastle Labour Club, Leazes Park Road, Newcastle NE1 4PF. Tel: 0191 232 8049. 7:45pm (doors). £22.00. (£19.00. adv.).

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Sirkis-Bialas IQ @ King's Hall, Newcastle University - Nov 14

Asaf Sirkis (drums, percussion, konnakol); Sylwia Bialas (vocals, waterphone); Frank Harrison (piano, keyboards); Kevin Glasgow (bass guitar). 
(Review by Russell).

The IQ's second album featured during this afternoon's King's Hall concert. Our New Earth serves to showcase the compositions of the two principals - Asaf Sirkis and Sylwia Bialas - with committed contributions from pianist Frank Harrison and bassist Kevin Glasgow. Drummer Sirkis did the talking, Bialas did the singing, all four did the playing to an attentive audience.

Sirkis' fizzing sticks, Bialas' soaring, at times near-operatic vocals, Harrison's mature piano playing, Glasgow's precise six-string bass playing, IQ (that's the International Quartet) is a working unit of five years or so and it shows - a glance, a nod, a smile, they knew where they were going. 

Bialas' Nocturnity pressed the Polish vocalist's waterphone into action. Consisting of a resonator bowl, cyclindrical neck and brass rods, the waterphone or 'ocean harp' emitted a range of resonant sounds as Bialas first scraped across the rods with a bow then struck with a rubberised hammer. As Sirkis, Harrison and Glasgow picked up on the sounds echoing around the room Bialas' vocal explorations encompassed lyrical expression in the form of scat and vocalese. 

For those unfamiliar with the work of Asaf Sirkis, the Israeli born, London resident musician is a fine drummer. A treat on some of his gigs, as was the case here in Newcastle, is to hear him launch into konnakol Carnatic (south Indian) singing. Applause should have reverberated around King's Hall but, somehow, Sirkis' vocal dexterity met with silence - perhaps, on this occasion, it wasn't the done thing to show appreciation.

A two-part suite - Rooting and the new CD's eponymous Our New Earth - concluded the performance which went down well with the public and student audience alike.
Russell.

3 comments :

Patrick said...

If there is no applause - the audience didn’t like it

Russell said...

Patrick, the absence of applause during a performance doesn't necessarily indicate audience dissatisfaction. On this occasion Asaf Sirkis' brilliant vocal feature didn't prompt applause, principally because everyone present was transfixed, listening intently to the group performance.

Chris K said...

Russell, I think you're spot on. Furthermore, the audience didn't seem to be familiar with a jazz format ...there was no applause for any individual solo effort, even the more conventional keyboard and bass. There was, however, sustained applause at the end of each song!

This was justified as this was a remarkably gifted outfit playing some remarkable music!