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Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Friday, November 15, 2019

Mondo Trumpet @ Gosforth Civic Theatre - November 14

Pete Tanton (trumpet/flugelhorn/vocal); Graham Hardy (trumpet/flugelhorn); Paul Edis (piano); Andy Champion (bass/bass guitar/acoustic guitar); Russ Morgan (drums).
(Review by Lance/Photos courtesy of Pam).

Mondo Trumpet or World Trumpet grew from an idea born in a bar in Brasilia (Brass-ilia?) – or was it Byker? – where our two trumpeting toreadors thought it would be a worthwhile conception to compose and arrange music depicting various parts of the world.

The room was comfortably filled, the trio primed for action on the floor level stage and an expectant hush descended as we waited, and waited and waited until, after a fanfare that sounded a bit like Rule Britannia – was this going to be a Brexit Bash? – the co-leaders emerged from the wings and we were transported to sunnier climes, the cats and dogs that were peppering the pavement outside forgotten.

The opener, Tanton told us, came from Portugal. It was impressive and reminded me of Work Song which it wasn’t. The duo also reminded me of the Candoli Brothers without the screamers. The sound was good and all five were at the top of their game.

I didn’t catch all of the titles but what’s in a name? Shoe Tree Blues, composed by Hardy referred to a tree in Armstrong Park which, I gather, has boots and shoes dangling from its branches. Moral Compass featured a vocal by Pete Tanton. The amiable American has a way with words (check out his novel Johnny Lonely) and he delivered the song in an easy relaxed style.

Nothing relaxed about the next number. Hardy was growling, Edis was on fire, Morgan dispensed with sticks and used his hands whilst Champion fiddled as Tanton burned. This was wild, the rhythm section building up the tension until the brassmen took it out in a blaze of glory and this was just the first set!

During the interval I got the chance to chat with no less a person than Peter Fielding’s son. Fielding, whom local music historians of a certain age will remember as bandleader at the Oxford Galleries, Newcastle, during the 1930s, has oft been a topic for discussion on BSH and hopefully we will get the opportunity sometime for a longer chat with his son.

Set two began with the two trumpet players making a theatrical entrance, as befits the venue, working their way towards the stage, the sound reminiscent of the music at a Mexican plaza de toros. However, once the quintet hit their stride, there wasn’t any bull from the horns although, on this number, the coup de grace was delivered by Edis at the upright. Always good to hear a real piano and never better than when it’s being put through its paces by Paul.

If you’re in Norway, it’s on the cards that Eddie Grieg will show up and tonight was no exception with Hardy exquisitely blowing flugel on Solveig’s Song from the Norwegian composer’s Peer Gynt Suite.

Champion moved on to acoustic guitar (he's a contender in that area too!), piano and drums exited stage right, and the trumpets played what Tanton described as a Texas Mariachi piece by Dizzy Gillespie.

And so the evening enfolded as our global tour continued ending up in Tokyo with a piece titled Japanation. It had been a fascinating journey and one well worthy of repetition.
What a wonderful mondo!
Lance

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