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Bebop Spoken There

Marc Myers: " If the original group with Baker was Dover sole, the group with Brookmeyer was beef stew." - (JazzWax, December 7, 2019).

Archive

Today Tuesday December 10

Afternoon

Jazz

Classic Swing - The Ship Inn, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 0191 251 3677. 1:00pm - 3:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jam session - Black Swan Bar, Newcastle Arts Centre, Westgate Road, Newcastle NE1 1SG. Tel: 0191 222 9882. 8:00pm. House trio: Mark Williams, Paul Grainger, Rob Walker.

Tyne Valley Big Band - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB.Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

Blues/Soul/Folk etc.

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, September 30, 2019

Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club - September 30

(Review by Russell)

A quintet today with Don Armstrong playing a final gig with the band before heading back to Oz. The Crescent Club's bar was doing good business on a sunny Monday lunchtime as Herbie Hudson and the boys got things under way with When You Wore a Tulip.

Lots of vocals and vocalists today (reedsman Armstrong sharing duties with HH on the opener), Ollie Rillands drumming and singing on Green Door (HH harmonica) and the first of Jazz in the Afternoon's guests - harmonica ace Brian Lynham - singing and blowing harp on Cleanhead Vinson's Kidney Stew Blues. Our No Time for Jive* frontman stayed on to form a harmonica duo with Hudson on Makin' Whoopee

Mercury nominees, big band legends and UK debuts: Full lineup announced for Marsden Jazz Festival

(Press release - Image © David Preston)

The full lineup has been announced for one of the jazz circuit’s best-loved festivals and, as ever, it’s a heady mix of classic and cutting edge, world-class and family friendly (often all at the same time).

Marsden Jazz Festival, which earlier this year made it through to the final of the prestigious Parliamentary Jazz Awards, celebrates its 28th year and takes place on 11-13 October 2019 in the beautiful Pennine village of Marsden. 

The Things We Did Last Summer

I'm currently semi-housebound - don't ask! - and, as so often happens in these situations, a song gets lodged in your head and you can't shift it - not that I particularly want to shift this one as it's one of the best and it didn't come from the pen of Gershwin, Porter, Kern, Berlin, Rodgers, Mercer or Carmichael. No, the music was by  Jule Styne and the words by Sammy Cahn. 

This was in 1946 and  it charted for Jo Stafford who sneaked her version out ahead of Sinatra's who, seemingly, wasn't pleased.

Instrumentally, among others, Fats Navarro, Roy Hargrove, Freddie Hubbard, Richie Kamuka and Buddy de Franco made impressive recordings. However, I'm going to sneak into Ann Alex territory and concentrate on the lyric.

BBC playing the changes

Changes are afoot at the Beeb. Radio 3's Jazz Now has bitten the dust, Geoffrey Smith's Jazz is soon to experience a similar fate, Jazz Record Requests is moving from its familiar Saturday slot and the network is to enter into a content sharing arrangement with Jazz FM. 

Radio 3's long-running JRR presented by Alyn Shipton moves to 4:00pm Sunday starting this coming weekend (October 6th). From November 2nd Corey Mwamba presents Freeness (midnight Saturdays). 

BBC Two and BBC Four will see 'emerging artists' appearing on Later with Jools Holland and a documentary series slated for Four includes features on Miles Davis, Bluenote and Billie Holiday. 

Meanwhile Radio 3's In Tune (Monday-Friday, 5:00pm) continues with its occasional live studio jazz sessions, the next one being Tuesday (October 1st) with an appearance by the Hackney Colliery Band 
Russell

Sunday, September 29, 2019

CD Review: Enrico Rava, Joe Lovano - Roma

Enrico Rava (trumpet); Joe Lovano (tenor saxtarogato); Giovanni Guidi (piano); 
Dezron Douglas (bass); Gerald Cleaver (drums) 
(Review by Chris K)

The second of two outstanding ECM releases this month led by trumpeters (third if you count Tom Harrell with Ethan Iverson reviewed by Lance here). This time it’s Italian superstar Enrico Rava, powers undimmed aged 80 on the evidence of this live album recorded in Rome at the end of last year.  Rava shares the lead and compositions here with Joe Lovano,  another veteran of Italian ancestry via Berklee. The two cook up a lively hour’s worth of trading high energy lines, with a major, and calmer, contribution from another Italian – the rapidly emerging Giovanni Guidi. All driven along by a first-rate high-powered young US rhythm section of Dezron Douglas and Gerald Cleaver, particularly effective on some long jam sections reminiscent of 70s' Miles or Ian Carr’s Nucleus.  

Kurt Rosenwinkel Bandit 65 @ Sage Gateshead - September 28

Kurt Rosenwinkel (guitar, electronics); Tim Motzer (guitar, guitar synth, electronics); Gintas Janusonis (drums, percussion, electronics)
(Review by Russell)

Bandit 65 has been described as a 'post-jazz sonic trio'. The box office name is Kurt Rosenwinkel, the guitarist's lower profile co-leaders - Tim Motzer, guitar, Gintas Janusonis, drums - are deserving of equal billing but, hey, this is showbusiness. Other than concert appearances in London this Sage Gateshead performance was Rosenwinkel's first British gig! Considering the guitarist has been active on the jazz (post-jazz?) scene for the best part of thirty years it was a long overdue visit to these shores.

Situations Vacant


Mike Cunningham of Hexham Jazz Club has issued the following statement on Facebook:

"Hi all, unfortunately I won't be able to continue organising the Jazz nights at the Fox. I will be there for the remaining gigs already booked, so we will have Zoë Gilby on October 8th, Not Now Charlie on November 12th and the Tyne Valley Big Band on December 10th. If anyone fancies taking over, let me know or come down for a chat at one of the upcoming gigs
Cheers Mike."

Sad news indeed. We wish Mike all the best and hope someone will step in and take over.
Lance

Saturday, September 28, 2019

House of the Black Gardenia @ The Old Coal Yard - September 27

(Review by Russell)

From Ellington through to a closing left hook landing squarely on the bonce of the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, the House of the Black Gardenia owned the joint. It wasn't quite Duke gracing the Savoy Ballroom, more like Bobbi Charleston and her boys down the Old Coal Yard. 

Several large, chic industrial heaters warded off a chill autumn air, an air wafting street food vendors' oh-so-tempting pizzas across the Byker premises. Swing dancers gathered preparing to strut their stuff as drinkers queued at Northern Alchemy's no-frills bar. A pint of, hmmm...Passion Fruit and Pineapple Sour*. Okay, the band is on, Ellington (Keith Robinson a key Ellingtonian).

CD Review: Ethan Iverson Quartet with Tom Harrell - Common Practice

Tom Harrell (trumpet); Ethan Iverson (piano); Ben Street (bass); Eric McPherson (drums).
(Review by Lance)

Maybe I shall hear it Sunday,
Maybe Monday, maybe not
Still I'm sure to hear it one day
Maybe Tuesday will be my good news day.

As it happened, Friday turned out to be my good news day...

Over the years I've been impressed by the volume of CDs issued by Herr Eicher on his ECM label most of which have received rave reviews in DownBeat, Jazzwise - even within these pages - and yet, somehow, Cupid's arrow has, in the main, landed short of my heart - until now that is.

The arrival of an ECM package automatically puts my brain into delegating mode and, for once, that delegated reviewer turns out to be me!

Friday, September 27, 2019

2019 British Jazz Awards - Voting now open.

Big Bear Music have released their list of nominations for this years British Jazz Awards and the polls are now open.

Click on the image for the runners and riders and click on this link  to place your bets - sorry, to cast your vote.

The polls close on Oct. 28..
Lance.

Scarborough Jazz Festival 2019. Sunday Sept. 22. Evening Session. Partisans and Jim Mullen and the Volunteers.

Partisans: Julian Siegel (reeds), Phil Robson (guitar), Thaddeus Kelly (bass guitar), Gene Calderazzo (drums).
(Review/photos by Steve T).

Mr Birkett, his trio and guests on keyboard and clarinet had them dancing in the aisles so Partisans were already onstage by the time I returned to the main hall. I'd seen them before and enjoyed it but this was better; much better. 

The second piece was That's Not His Bag but we were assured it referred to Easyjet and not James Brown. Robson - having whet our appetite with Dankworth - was playing pedalled up guitar and crazy chords, weaving solos in and out of Siegel's sax and I'll be amazed if the guitarist isn't familiar with prog guitar maestro Steve Howe.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

CD Review: Loz Speyer's Time Zone - Clave Sin Embargo

Loz Speyer (trumpet/flugelhorn); Martin Hathaway (alto sax/bass clarinet); Stuart Hall (guitar); Dave Manington (bass); Maurizio Ravalico (congas); Andy Ball (drums).
(Review by Lance)

In an earlier review, Steve H queried as to whatever world music may be. A good question as, is not music made the world over? Which also begs the question, is all music not made by folk?

No less an authority than John Fordham of The Guardian is quoted as saying "Nobody writes world music quite like Loz Speyer, and he's long deserved a bigger stage, and the resources to match".

CD Review: Playing the Room - Avishai Cohen, Yonathan Avishai


Avishai Cohen  (trumpet),  Yonathan Avishai   (piano)
(Review by Chris Kilsby)

The first of two outstanding ECM releases this month - both led by trumpet players - this one a duo with piano.  The horn here is that of New York based Israeli Avishai Cohen, not to be confused with the virtuoso bass player of the same name who has been on the scene rather longer.  This Avishai mostly follows a cool and detached jazz dialect here, by contrast to his compatriot namesake’s famously strong Middle Eastern groove. Until digesting this release, I had the trumpeter down as the lesser of the two Cohens, but now I’m not so sure, especially after the bass player’s recent lapse into popular vocals! 

Scarborough Jazz Festival 2019. Sunday, September 22. Afternoon Session: Alec Dankworth's Spanish Accents and Bonsai.

Alec Dankworth's Spanish Accents:
Graciela Rodriquez (vocal), Jesus Olmedo (dance), Roland Sutherland (flute), Mark Lockheart (saxes), Phil Robson (guitar), Alec Danworth (double bass), Demi Garcia Sabat (drums).
(Review/photos by Steve T).

Dog-sitter problems meant we had to forfeit the first band of the session but arrived just in time for this impressive lineup. The thought of some sketches of Spain and Tijuana moods was mouth-watering but also presented problems of translation, comprehension and no doubt spelling, so apologies in advance for going with his translations.

The first piece translated as In Your Latte and brought the first of many fine solos from flautist Roland Sutherland. The instrument is still a relative rarity in jazz which always keep them interesting.

Pannonica @ The Jazz Cafe - September 25

Zoë Gilby (vocals); Paul Edis (piano)
(Review by Russell)

It's a fairy story with numerous exotic characters. None more exotic than the improbably named Baroness Kathleen Annie Pannonica de Koenigswarter aka Nica, the Bebop Baroness. Of the Rothschild dynasty, Pannonica gave it all up (stately homes, butlers, maids, the lot) to immerse herself in NYC's bebop firmament. Carmen McRae, Jon Hendricks, Charlie Parker and Bud Powell are a well drawn supporting cast of characters. The other name, of course, Thelonious Monk. Reading excerpts from the Pannonica story book today was Tyneside's star vocalist Zoë Gilby.

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Alter Ego @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle - September 24

Keith Robinson (alto sax); Niall Armstrong (tenor sax, flute); Dave Hignett (trumpet, flugelhorn); Graham Don (keyboards); Tony Abell (bass); David Johnson (drums)
(Review by Russell)

On a rainy Tuesday evening Prohibition Bar opened its doors to host two events - a self-defense course and a gig. Decisions! Decisions! Your correspondent deftly skirted past Inspector Clouseau and Cato to take the stairs to the first floor performance venue to catch Alter Ego. 

It had been a while since BSH last heard Keith Robinson and co. In the interim a couple of new faces - Graham Don, piano and David Johnson, drums - had joined the core unit of Robinson, fellow reedsman Niall Armstrong, Tynedale's brassman Dave Hignett and bassist Tony Abell. 

CD/Tour details: Mario Chiara Argirò - Hidden Seas


(Press release)


Hidden Seas is London-based Italian pianist and composer Maria Chiara Argirò’s second album, following on from her 2016 debut The Fall Dance. She is a well-known name on the London scene – her keyboard skills much in demand – currently involved with a variety of musical projects including Liran Donin's 1000 Boats, Kinkajous, Teotima, Rosie Turton and Jamie Leeming.

Fabled @ The Bridge Hotel, Newcastle - Sept. 22

Sam Rapley (sax/clarinet/compositions); Alex Munk (guitar); Matt Robinson (piano); Conor Chaplin (double bass); Will Glaser (drums)

(Review by Steve H/Photo courtesy of Ken Drew)

Weirdly, for an album tour, the band had no CDs for sale. This though was for the best  of reasons - they had sold them all at their previous gig as part of the Scarborough Jazz Festival. 

Fabled was formed by Sam Rapley in 2014, a debut EP followed in 2015 and they are now touring their first album Short Stories. According to the pre-publicity the band draws inspiration from various musical genres - classical, jazz, world (whatever that may be)  and indie folk. Rapley also has a keen interest in cinematic music having already scored several soundtracks for short movies. 

Roll on 2020

This coming October (11) sees the 100th anniversary of the birth of drummer Art Blakey. October (16) is also when he passed away 29 years ago. Needless to say, such a centennial is being remembered by a number of bands worldwide on record, on tour and, in this case, both.

Gaz Hughes has put together a line-up to die for - one that will surely do justice to Abdullah Ibn Buhaina (Art Blakey's adopted Muslim name).

As the above list of dates shows, the band are at Gosforth Civic Theatre on February 20 next year, put it in your diary now!
Lance.
CD Review to follow when available.

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

CD Review: Peter Eldridge and Kenny Werner – Somewhere


Peter Eldridge (vocal); Kenny Werner (piano); Matt Aronoff (bass); Yoron Israel (drums) + 20 piece string orchestra conducted by Eugene Friesen.
(Review by James Henry)

"Somewhere" is a gentle, soothing offering from Peter Eldridge, Kenny Werner and a string orchestra, the culmination of an idea shared by  Eldridge and Werner that began about 10 years ago.  It would be terribly easy to combine Eldridge’s crooning baritone voice, Werner’s gentle piano fills and a string orchestra to recreate Frank Sinatra or Nat King Cole: thankfully, this CD doesn’t seek to do this. "Somewhere" is a fresh interpretation of song, strings, and soothing, gentle jazz; it is an antidote to the troubled times in which we live.   

Monday, September 23, 2019

Preview: Kurt Rosenwinkel @ Sage Gateshead (Saturday 28)

(Preview by Russell)

Since the early 90s Kurt Rosenwinkel has released a steady stream of albums as leader or in collaboration with others and clocked up 150-plus sessions as a sideman. Now in his late forties, the Pennsylvania-born guitarist is an influential figure on the contemporary jazz scene and a first appearance in the region this weekend is likely to result in guitarists from all points heading to Sage Gateshead's Northern Rock Foundation Hall. 

Sunday Jazz @ Middlesbrough - It's Started!

Ros Rigby, that indefatigable supporter of jazz and all art related genres, tells me that the first of the monthly Sunday afternoon jazz concerts at Middlesbrough Town Hall got off to a good start yesterday. The three bands were the Noel Dennis Trio (photo courtesy of Ros Rigby), Emma Johnson’s Gravy Boat (who were excellent and went down extremely well - which is great as it’s all original material) and Anthony Strong and his band.

Rick Laughlin's Electet @ Dormans Jazz Club,Middlesbrough - September 19.

Rick Laughlin (keys); Ian Halford (kit); Phil Laughlin (bass); Dan Johnson (tenor sax); Sue Ferris (tenor sax); Josh Bentham (alto sax); Alan Thompson (soprano sax). 
(Review by Ron H)

Playing for the first time at Dormans Jazz Club, Electet soon showed the large audience that we were in for an exciting night of  funky fusion style jazz.

Starting the first set with Shuffled, a bouncy/bluesy number featuring all four saxes, followed by Two Mules, a fusion style composition featuring Dan Johnson and Josh Bentham, set the standard for the night.

Yellow Fever with a haunting opening by Alan Thompson on soprano, a funky feature for Rick & Sue Ferris during which they encountered a variety of time signatures.

CD Review: Mark Kavuma - The Banger Factory

Mark Kavuma (trumpet/composer); 
Mussinghi Brian Edwards, Kaidi Akinnibi (tenor sax); Artie Zaitz (guitar); David Mrakpor (vibes); Reuben James (piano/organ); Dechanel Gordon (piano); Michael Shrimpling (double bass); William Cleasby (drums). 

(Review by Lance).


Back in the mists of time when I was at school, one of the teacher's idea of punishment for failing to submit homework on time was to sentence the offender to write procrastination 100 times. By the time I left school I knew the meaning of procrastination!

It took no less than the lead article in the October edition of DownBeat for me to realise that I still hadn't learnt my lesson. I had once again been guilty of procrastinating. However, this time it wasn't my inability to explain Boyle's Law (The pressure of a given mass of an ideal gas is inversely proportional to its volume at a constant temperature) but my failure to review this excellent album by Mark Kavuma which has been hovering around the top of the heap since July.

Sometimes it happens that way, sir, I sit down with the best of intentions then another CD arrives and then another and so on - well that's my excuse except, in this case, there's no excuse - this banger is a cracker!

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Strictly Smokin' Sessions II @ The Black Swan - Sept. 17

Strictly Smokin' returned for a second year under commission from Jazz North East to create new music composed by four members of the Strictly Smokin’ Big Band - hence the four sets with a varying combination of musicians performing in each one. 

This year Graham Don (Piano), Steve Summers (reeds),  Michael Whent (bass guitar),  and Alice Grace (voice) created compositions performed (and conducted by) by the composers themselves with other members of the Big Band, including Michael Lamb, Jamie Toms, Pete Tanton, Kieran Parnaby, Pawel Jedrzejewski and Guy Swinton in support.
Ken Drew.
More photos.

Barnhart goes to the movies @ St Augustine's, Darlington - September 21

(Review by Russell)

This time last year at Darlington New Orleans Jazz Club Jeff Barnhart presented his Silent Comedy Film Festival - Reel 1. St Augustine's audience loved it and the popular American promised to return with more classic material from cinema's pioneering years. True to his word our piano master returned with 'Reel 2' under his arm. 

Buster Keaton is a hero for Barnhart and always features in his silent film presentations. Reel 2 included The Bell Boy (Keaton, co-star and director, 25 mins) from 1918. As Barnhart observed, Keaton's on-screen performance alongside Fatty Arbuckle received favourable reviews and as his co-star would soon be engulfed in scandal this was, in some ways, a pivotal moment. 

The Sumner Suite @ The Gosforth Hotel

(By Russell)
A rare visit to the Gosforth Hotel to watch the Newcastle v Brighton Premier League match on tv. A pint from the Cullercoats Brewery first half, a pint from the Whitley Bay Brewing Company second half (keeping it local) then at full time (0-0) a trip to the gents. On the wall at the bottom of the stairs was a sign 'The Sumner Suite'. 

Ah, the memories came flooding back! Way back when, every Wednesday night, 40p on the door to see a local band called Last Exit. Terry Ellis, guitar, Gerry Richardson, keyboards, Ronnie Pearson, drums and one Gordon Sumner, bass guitar. Yes Gordon Sumner, or Sting, as he was already known, was soon to hit the big time. Jazz, jazz funk, original material, Last Exit was one of those once in a generation outfits. 

Saturday, September 21, 2019

CD Review: Hendrik Meurkens - Cobb's Pocket

Hendrik Meurkens (harmonica); Peter Bernstein (guitar); Mike LeDonne (organ); Jimmy Cobb (drums)
(Review by Lance).

When Harold Mabern, who died on Thursday (Sept.19), had to pull out of a UK visit last August his place was taken by Mike LeDonne. LeDonne, featured in the October issue of DownBeat, turns up in top level company here and makes his presence felt along with guitarist Bernstein, jazz legend Jimmy Cobb and harmonica ace Meurkens.

Described in the blurb as the most important voice on the instrument since Toots Thielemans, Meurkens lives up to the billing. His dexterity on harmonica is equal to just about any sax player and, like Thielemans before him, banishes any misgivings as to the credibility of the instrument.

Nick Pride & the Pimptones @ Hoochie Coochie September 20

Nick Pride (guitar, vocals); Alex Saxon (alto sax, flute, vocals); Keith Nicholson (trumpet, vocals); Jimmy Brown (bass);  Peter Lawson (drums); Eliza Lawson (vocals) 
(Review by Russell)

Proprietor Mr T told a packed Hoochie Coochie that when he first opened the doors on Pilgrim Street Nick Pride was the first soul man to ask if he and the Pimptones could play a gig. It's only taken nine and a half years to get them back! said WT. And with that the sharp-suited Pimptones launched into a Northern (Tyneside) Soul-to-funk set which kept the punters on the floor from start to finish.

Come and Get It bellowed the Pimptones and that's precisely what the band's legion of fans did right up close and personal in front of the six piece. The rhythm section - bassist Jimmy Brown and drummer Peter Lawson - absolutely nailed it to the floor as Eliza Lawson bounced and stomped across the stage with boundless energy and killer, high octane vocals. 

Friday, September 20, 2019

Mark Williams Trio @ The Merry Monk, Bishop Auckland - September 20

Mark Williams (guitar); Paul Susans (double bass); Russ Morgan (drums) 
(Review by Russell)

An impossibly sunny day in Bishop Auckland. Stan Laurel couldn't believe it, scratching his head, as was/is his wont. Sadly Mr Laurel couldn't make it to the Merry Monk, fortunately a hardy band of Town Hall regulars made it in time for the one o'clock start. Same format - a one hour set, a fiver on the door. 

The Town Hall's temporary closure necessitated a move to the adjacent Merry Monk pub. September's monthly Friday jazz concert promotion presented the Mark Williams Trio. It was to be a set of standards given a Williams' twist, so inventive is the master guitarist. I Should Care opened the set, a tune popularised back in the day by the big bands and here in twenty-first century County Durham we were treated to a guitar-led trio version. Irishman Williams constructs solos like no one else. It is as if his fully formed solos are predetermined, what is for certain is he has, and continues to, put in the hard yards and on a gig such as this it pays off handsomely.  

RIP Harold Mabern

Just heard the sad news that legendary post-bop pianist Harold Mabern (pictured with Martin Hummel)died yesterday (Sept. 19) although, after pulling out of a UK tour through ill health last August, I suppose the advance warnings were there.

It is to my eternal regret that I never heard him live - only on record. The record I'm thinking of is Harold with Eric Alexander - Burnin' in London by the New York All Stars. When Alyn Shipton asked for Record of the Year selections on Jazz Record Requests this was my automatic choice.
In earlier years he was almost a house pianist at Blue Note playing on albums with Hank Mobley (Dippin'), Lee Morgan (The Gigolo) and Freddie Hubbard (Night of the Cookers) among others.

Harold Mabern was 83 - he will be sadly missed.
Lance

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Dave Rae's Levee Ramblers New Orleans Jazz Band @ Springwell Village Community Venue - September 18

Dave Rae (banjo, vocals); Bob Wade (trumpet, clarinet); Jim McBriarty (clarinet, vocals); Jim Blenkin (trombone); John Robinson (double bass)
(Review by Russell)

Dave Rae's Springwell session is one of the region's enduring residencies. Wednesday evening, week in, week out, the Levee Ramblers bring a touch of New Orleans to the Borough of Gateshead. From time to time the core band is augmented by the presence of a guest star or, as was the case this week, in the the absence of three of its members (the Bacons, Liz and Paul, and Mick Hill) top class guests/deps made welcome appearances.

Clarinetist Jim McBriarty depped for Liz B, trumpeter Bob Wade for Mick Hill and, interestingly, the Ramblers chose not to draft in a dep for drummer Paul B. So, it would be a three-horn front line supported by a two-string rhythm section of Dave Rae, banjo, and string bass man John Robinson. The set list comprised the tried and tested and that is no bad thing as the Levee Ramblers play it better than most - 'it' being the music of the pioneering musicians of the twenties and thirties. 

CD/LP Review: Doc Bowling & his Blues Professors - Cosmopolitan Soul

(Review by Lance)

Regarded by many as London's top contemporary blues band which, some may argue, means the UK's number 1, Doc Bowling and his Professors do nothing to change that view with this vinyl offering (also available on CD and download).

This isn't one of those "Well I woke up this mornin' bands" although they obviously did. The material, however, is more in tune with today with the overall feel being an appeal for racial integration.

The Rockin' Turner Brothers

Come rain or come shine buskers doggedly do their thing. Today (Tuesday), as the sun shone down on Northumberland Street the Turner brothers pitched-up outside Fenwick's to play some rockabilly, Western swing, blues and jazz. As your correspondent walked by the boys were playing I'll See You in My Dreams - a jazz standard with a rockabilly edge. The Rockin' Turner Brothers gig with a drummer and early next year they'll be at Billy Bootleggers. Go hear them.   
Russell   

CD Review: Mark Sherman - My Other Voice.

Mark Sherman (piano); Vincent Herring(alto saxophone); Ray Drummond/Dan Chmielinski (bass); Nana Sakamoto (trombone); Carl Allen (drums).
(Review by James H)

Mark Sherman is best known as a percussionist and vibraphone player, having played vibes as a sideman to Peggy Lee and other big jazz names of the late 20th century, as well as classical percussion in orchestras conducted by Bernstein, Solti and the like.  He describes piano as “his other voice” hence the title of this new CD.  Piano may be Sherman’s other voice, but it is a bold and articulate voice in this eclectic collection of jazz standards, less well known tunes and his own compositions.   Mark teaches at The Juilliard School in New York and, on this album, he works with other established players on the New York scene as well as newcomers Nana Sakamoto on trombone and bassist Dan Chmielinski.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

CD Review: Moy Eng, Wayne Wallace – The Blue Hour


(Review by Ann Alex)

A collection of originals, with Ms Eng supplying vocals and lyrics and Wallace doing the tunes and the arrangements. Of Chinese-American descent and working in arts administration and grant-making organisations, Eng, who has been recognised in this field with honours from the California Arts Council and the World Affairs Council, currently works for a non-profit body developing affordable workspaces for the arts. This is her debut CD.

Trombonist, composer, producer and educator Wallace, from San Francisco, and a four-time Grammy nominee, has been involved in pop, soul, Latin and Afro-Caribbean music working with the likes of Count Basie, Aretha Franklin, Sonny Rollins and Carlos Santana.

Barnhart goes to the movies!

(Preview by Russell)

Jeff Barnhart is something of a silent film buff. So much so the American pianist will be applying his virtuosic keyboard skills as accompanist to screenings of several silent cinema era shorts at St Augustine's Parish Centre in Darlington.
 
At half past twelve on Saturday (Sep 21) the lights will go down for a matinee treat. Popcorn at the ready, well, more likely a cuppa or a pint, settle down for a laugh-a-minute afternoon as some of the great Hollywood names grace the Larchfield Street silver screen...Harold Lloyd, Bebe Daniels, Fatty Arbuckle, Buster Keaton, household names all. 

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Newcastle Jazz Festival - Past and Present

(By Dave Clarke)
Bebop’s review of the one-day showcase of six regional bands at the Tyne Bank Brewery in August referred back to the festival from which it took its name – Newcastle Jazz Festival 1974 to 1995 -which, it told us, featured Art Pepper, George Melly and Barney Kessel. “Those were indeed halcyon days” said the review “but to compare today’s festival with those that took place back then – as has been done elsewhere – defeats the object entirely.”  Well does it? What exactly is the object that is being defeated by making the comparison? As far as I could see the review didn’t provide the answer.
I have no objection at all to an event showcasing the best of the regional bands. After all I’m pretty sure I booked all of the bands featured but for the Big Band when I was working at the Jazz Cafe – and that includes Alexander Bone. But Newcastle Jazz Festival ran for a full week, featured major national and international names, filled the 5 or 600-seat Newcastle Playhouse from 1975 on and for its last half dozen years also had a second venue at Live Theatre. It was, in short, one of the city’s major annual cultural events.
So I just can’t see the justification in calling the event at Tyne Bank Brewery the “Newcastle Jazz Festival.”  Tyne Bank Jazz Festival, yes.  Ouseburn Jazz Festival, fine. Or East End Jazz Festival.

Monday, September 16, 2019

Bruce Adams with the Paul Edis Trio @ Blaydon Jazz Club - September 15

Bruce Adams (trumpet, flugelhorn); Paul Edis (piano); Andy Champion (double bass); Russ Morgan (drums) 
(Review & right hand close-up by Russell/Band photos by Roly)

Blaydon Jazz Club, like most jazz clubs, has had its share of ups and downs...the halcyon days, the big names, the full houses, and, of course, the leaner times. Thirty five years almost to the day (September 14, 1984 to be exact) Blaydon Jazz Club booked a big name to work with the finest jazz piano trio around and, good on 'em, the regulars rallied round making the evening of September 15, 2019 one to remember.