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Bebop Spoken There

Diana Krall: "It was daunting to play in front of her [Joni Mitchell] but it was also wonderful." - (DownBeat October 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Friday September 20

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Rendezvous Jazz - Monkseaton Arms, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. Tel: 0191 251 3928. 1:00pm. Free.

Classic Swing - Jesmond Royal British Legion Club, West Jesmond Avenue, Jesmond, Newcastle NE2 3EX. Tel: 0191 281 0736. 1:00pm. Free.

Mark Williams Trio - The Merry Monk, 30 Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL14 7NP. 1:00pm. £5.00. Pub adjacent to Bishop Auckland Town Hall.

Evening.

Alexito & Loco Machine - Revoluçion de Cuba, Cloth Market, Newcastle NE1 1EE. Tel: 0191 917 7076. 6:00pm. Free.

Jazz Lads - Saltburn Cricket Club, Marske Mill Lane, Saltburn TS12 1HJ. Tel: 01287 622761. 8:00pm. £5.00.

Zoë Gilby: Watching Sideways - Victoria Tunnel, Ouse Street, Newcastle NE1 2BE. Tel: 0191 230 4210. 8:00pm. £10.00.

Mark Williams & Pete Tanton - The Golden Lion, Market Place, Allendale NE47 9BD. Tel: 01434 683225. 9:00pm. Free.

Blues/Soul etc.

No Time For Jive - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

Nick Pride & the Pimptones - Hoochie Coochie, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6SF. Tel: 0191 222 0130. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Dave Rae's Levee Ramblers New Orleans Jazz Band @ Springwell Village Community Venue - September 18

Dave Rae (banjo, vocals); Bob Wade (trumpet, clarinet); Jim McBriarty (clarinet, vocals); Jim Blenkin (trombone); John Robinson (double bass)
(Review by Russell)

Dave Rae's Springwell session is one of the region's enduring residencies. Wednesday evening, week in, week out, the Levee Ramblers bring a touch of New Orleans to the Borough of Gateshead. From time to time the core band is augmented by the presence of a guest star or, as was the case this week, in the the absence of three of its members (the Bacons, Liz and Paul, and Mick Hill) top class guests/deps made welcome appearances.

Clarinetist Jim McBriarty depped for Liz B, trumpeter Bob Wade for Mick Hill and, interestingly, the Ramblers chose not to draft in a dep for drummer Paul B. So, it would be a three-horn front line supported by a two-string rhythm section of Dave Rae, banjo, and string bass man John Robinson. The set list comprised the tried and tested and that is no bad thing as the Levee Ramblers play it better than most - 'it' being the music of the pioneering musicians of the twenties and thirties. 

CD/LP Review: Doc Bowling & his Blues Professors - Cosmopolitan Soul

(Review by Lance)

Regarded by many as London's top contemporary blues band which, some may argue, means the UK's number 1, Doc Bowling and his Professors do nothing to change that view with this vinyl offering (also available on CD and download).

This isn't one of those "Well I woke up this mornin' bands" although they obviously did. The material, however, is more in tune with today with the overall feel being an appeal for racial integration.

The Rockin' Turner Brothers

Come rain or come shine buskers doggedly do their thing. Today (Tuesday), as the sun shone down on Northumberland Street the Turner brothers pitched-up outside Fenwick's to play some rockabilly, Western swing, blues and jazz. As your correspondent walked by the boys were playing I'll See You in My Dreams - a jazz standard with a rockabilly edge. The Rockin' Turner Brothers gig with a drummer and early next year they'll be at Billy Bootleggers. Go hear them.   
Russell   

CD Review: Mark Sherman - My Other Voice.

Mark Sherman (piano); Vincent Herring(alto saxophone); Ray Drummond/Dan Chmielinski (bass); Nana Sakamoto (trombone); Carl Allen (drums).
(Review by James H)

Mark Sherman is best known as a percussionist and vibraphone player, having played vibes as a sideman to Peggy Lee and other big jazz names of the late 20th century, as well as classical percussion in orchestras conducted by Bernstein, Solti and the like.  He describes piano as “his other voice” hence the title of this new CD.  Piano may be Sherman’s other voice, but it is a bold and articulate voice in this eclectic collection of jazz standards, less well known tunes and his own compositions.   Mark teaches at The Juilliard School in New York and, on this album, he works with other established players on the New York scene as well as newcomers Nana Sakamoto on trombone and bassist Dan Chmielinski.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

CD Review: Moy Eng, Wayne Wallace – The Blue Hour


(Review by Ann Alex)

A collection of originals, with Ms Eng supplying vocals and lyrics and Wallace doing the tunes and the arrangements. Of Chinese-American descent and working in arts administration and grant-making organisations, Eng, who has been recognised in this field with honours from the California Arts Council and the World Affairs Council, currently works for a non-profit body developing affordable workspaces for the arts. This is her debut CD.

Trombonist, composer, producer and educator Wallace, from San Francisco, and a four-time Grammy nominee, has been involved in pop, soul, Latin and Afro-Caribbean music working with the likes of Count Basie, Aretha Franklin, Sonny Rollins and Carlos Santana.

Barnhart goes to the movies!

(Preview by Russell)

Jeff Barnhart is something of a silent film buff. So much so the American pianist will be applying his virtuosic keyboard skills as accompanist to screenings of several silent cinema era shorts at St Augustine's Parish Centre in Darlington.
 
At half past twelve on Saturday (Sep 21) the lights will go down for a matinee treat. Popcorn at the ready, well, more likely a cuppa or a pint, settle down for a laugh-a-minute afternoon as some of the great Hollywood names grace the Larchfield Street silver screen...Harold Lloyd, Bebe Daniels, Fatty Arbuckle, Buster Keaton, household names all. 

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Newcastle Jazz Festival - Past and Present

(By Dave Clarke)
Bebop’s review of the one-day showcase of six regional bands at the Tyne Bank Brewery in August referred back to the festival from which it took its name – Newcastle Jazz Festival 1974 to 1995 -which, it told us, featured Art Pepper, George Melly and Barney Kessel. “Those were indeed halcyon days” said the review “but to compare today’s festival with those that took place back then – as has been done elsewhere – defeats the object entirely.”  Well does it? What exactly is the object that is being defeated by making the comparison? As far as I could see the review didn’t provide the answer.
I have no objection at all to an event showcasing the best of the regional bands. After all I’m pretty sure I booked all of the bands featured but for the Big Band when I was working at the Jazz Cafe – and that includes Alexander Bone. But Newcastle Jazz Festival ran for a full week, featured major national and international names, filled the 5 or 600-seat Newcastle Playhouse from 1975 on and for its last half dozen years also had a second venue at Live Theatre. It was, in short, one of the city’s major annual cultural events.
So I just can’t see the justification in calling the event at Tyne Bank Brewery the “Newcastle Jazz Festival.”  Tyne Bank Jazz Festival, yes.  Ouseburn Jazz Festival, fine. Or East End Jazz Festival.

Monday, September 16, 2019

Bruce Adams with the Paul Edis Trio @ Blaydon Jazz Club - September 15

Bruce Adams (trumpet, flugelhorn); Paul Edis (piano); Andy Champion (double bass); Russ Morgan (drums) 
(Review & right hand close-up by Russell/Band photos by Roly)

Blaydon Jazz Club, like most jazz clubs, has had its share of ups and downs...the halcyon days, the big names, the full houses, and, of course, the leaner times. Thirty five years almost to the day (September 14, 1984 to be exact) Blaydon Jazz Club booked a big name to work with the finest jazz piano trio around and, good on 'em, the regulars rallied round making the evening of September 15, 2019 one to remember.

Andy Hudson Recalls the First Soho Jazz Festival.

Andy Hudson has had many jazz associations over the years - Pianist, bandleader (Newcastle Big Band), Newcastle Jazz Festival, Cleveland Jazz Festival, JVC Jazz Festival and, the first Soho Jazz Festival.

Andy, in one of his leisure moments (he claims to have them!) has put together a few video clips of that first Soho Jazz Festival on Facebook along with his memories of the occasion which are well worth checking out - link.

As I still have the programme for the event I thought it might be worth linking the two.

CD Review: Dave Miller Trio - Just Imagine

Dave Miller (piano); Chuck Bennett (bass); Bill Belasco (drums)
(Review by Lance).

Miller makes no apologies - George Shearing is his inspiration. However, before you groan and mutter, 'not another  Lullaby of Birdland' you'll be pleased to know that Birdland remains high in the sky - at least on this CD.

Shearing may be his idol but Miller is still very much his own man although not averse to the block hand style Shearing favoured (as did Nat Cole and Milt Buckner before him) which he also uses equally effectively. So no, this isn't a parade of hits but songs that Shearing played along the way without being indelibly associated with them.

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance