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Bebop Spoken There

Davina Lozier: "So many people never settle into who they really are. They just do what they want to do because they want to be Oscar Peterson or Muddy Waters or Britney Spears. But I am what I am: a chubby, 40-year-old woman who's still doing it." - (DownBeat, December 2019).

Archive

Today Monday November 11

Afternoon

Jazz

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 3:40pm. Stanley Nelson's 2019 documentary film.

Evening

Soft Machine - Cluny, Lime St., Newcastle NE1 2PQ. Tel 0191 230 4474. 7:30pm. £17.50.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, August 31, 2019

Tulip & Lawrence @ Bar Tutster's - August 31

Francis Tulip (guitar); Ben Lawrence (keyboards)
(Review by Russell)

The County Durham outpost of Bishop Auckland has supported live jazz for many a year - the Tees Valley Jazzmen, recently at No.1 Champagne Bar, latterly at the Merry Monk, and Mick Shoulder's monthly promotion at the Town Hall (from September relocating to the Merry Monk due to the council premises undergoing major renovation work). In recent times Bar Tutster's on Fore Bondgate has offered the vacationing Francis Tulip a gig which the Birmingham Conservatoire music student readily accepted. 

Prom 54: Duke Ellington’s Sacred Music @ Royal Albert Hall – August 29


(Review by Alison Bentley)

In the beginning Ellington created three Sacred Concerts. This Prom brought together a selection of pieces taken from all three concerts, including big band, choir, soloists - and tap dancer. In the Royal Albert Hall, there was no incense - just dry ice drifting above the stage.

In the Beginning God opened the Prom, and also the first Concert of Sacred Music, in 1965 (in Grace Cathedral, San Francisco.) Peter Edwards tonight played Ellington’s role as pianist and conductor, opening with groovy 6-note riffs (representing the 6 syllables of the repeatedly chanted title.) Rhiannon Jeffreys’ fine bari work felt pleasantly cocooned by the gorgeous band voicings. US jazz-soul singer Carleen Anderson’s voice was as deep and resonant as Brock Peters’ 65 version, but with some of Abbey Lincoln’s tragic grandeur. She intoned Ellington’s witty beat poem over the band’s stupendous swing, debating the pros and cons of a time before creation:
“No headaches, no aspirin…
No Barracuda, no Buffalo, 
No birds, no bees, no beetles.”
Her impassioned conducting of the choir (the BBC Singers with the UK Vocal Assembly) was like a dance all by itself. They chanted the books of the Bible, speeding up till “Revelation” sparked an explosive drum solo from Rod Youngs.

DB Sound Project @ The Globe – August 29


David Keighley (saxes); Adrian Sander (bass); Ben Grant (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex)

The band worked hard and gave a good, lively performance tonight, but the audience was small, so where were you all? The music was a mixture of originals and re-imaginings of rock songs, complete with fairy lights flashing so as to complement the music, and electronic effects controlled by the saxman.

August Accolades

The Insanity of King Jazz


Thought the following excerpts below from a 1920s volume that belonged to a friend's grandmother would interest and amuse you.
Mike (Jamieson)
 ----- 
G. H. Clutsam (The Famous Composer).*

Jazz and Light Music

"It seems hardly possible that those of the public who derive their musical nourishment from either the stupid or the more exotic forms of jazz can appreciate the more normal types of music. But it may be!

... managers believe public taste to have been affected to such a radical extent by jazz that nothing else is required. I do not agree with this theory. There are still large numbers of people who hate the Negro music which was imported here from America a few years ago....

Friday, August 30, 2019

Swinging Down the Lane - Hand to Mouth on High Friar Lane - August 30

Lindsay Hannon (vocals); Bradley Johnston (guitar).
(Review by Lance)

Friday night in Newcastle - the sounds and the sights of the city. The police sirens, the ambulance sirens, the rumble of a subway train, the rattle of a taxi. The macho men in sleeveless shirts, the girls wearing even less, the incessant chatter on the mobile phones, the rock band practising for a demolition gig in Jericho.

In the midst of this potpourri of sound I pause, am I mistaken or is this Cole Porter I hear? It is! Its At Long Last Love.

Those City Hall jazz memories...

You were there - Basie, Duke, Ella, Hamp, Herman's Herd and Trane. And then there was Colyer and the three Bs - Barber, Bilk and Ball. Newbies caught Mahavishnu, Weather Report and latterly the Lincoln Center with Wynton. You've got the concert programmes somewhere, haven't you? And there are the photographs and ticket stubs, they're in the loft, aren't they? 

Newcastle City Libraries is preparing another in its popular series of local history books and you are being asked to share memorabilia or simply memories of those great nights at Newcastle City Hall. Tyne Bridge Publishing, the in-house publishing house of Newcastle City Libraries, wants to hear from you. In the first instance email: 

Russell

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Francis Tulip Quintet featuring Xhosa Cole @ the Bridge Hotel, Newcastle, - August 25

Xhosa Cole (tenor sax); Francis Tulip (guitar);  Ben Lawrence (keys); Shivraj Singh (double bass); Matthew Holmes (drums).

Due to a variety of circumstances we were unable to provide a blow by blow account of this JNE gig but, it would appear to have been comparable with the band's gig, albeit with a slight change of personnel, the day previous at Ushaw. If this was indeed the case then it must have been an excellent session.
Fortunately, although there is no written review we do, thanks to Ken Drew, have a pictorial record of the event with some atmospheric shots.

To view, check out this link to Ken's photos.
Lance

Preview: Ellington at the Proms - tonight!


Duke Ellington's Sacred Concerts form the basis of this evening's late night Prom. The three late-career works (written between 1965-1973) were regarded by the composer as being his most important contribution to music. Tonight, live from the Albert Hall on Radio 3, Peter Edwards conducts the Nu Civilisation Orchestra in a reworking of Ellington's enduring music with Monty Alexander at the concert grand. Carleen Anderson assumes the role of principal singer alongside tap dancer Annette Walker. The ninety minutes' broadcast begins at 10:15. The Prom will be shown on BBC Four on Friday 6 September at 10:10pm. 

Last week (August 21) Leah Williams attended the Proms and wrote a glowing review of Mississippi Goddam: A Homage to Nina Simone. So be sure to tune in to BBC Four tomorrow (Friday) at 10:30pm to experience something of the occasion for yourself.    

And, in the coming days, a review of tonight's Prom will appear on this blog.
Russell

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Proper crowdfunding on Northumberland Street - August 28

Bagging the prime pitch outside of Fenwick's, Proper Buzzin' set about raising a few quid - perhaps a recording session is in the offing. Katy Trigger in pink shorts (see photo) gave 'Showtime' David Gray a run for his money in the natty summer attire stakes as the entertaining trio won applause from shoppers munching on sausage rolls ('proper' or vegan) as pennies from heavenly passers-by helped swell the coffers.  
Russell  

CD Review: Fabrizio Sciacca Quartet - Gettin' It There

Jed Levy (tenor sax); Donald Vega (piano); Fabrizio Sciacca (bass); Billy Drummond (drums).
(Review by Lance).

I view bands led by bass players even more sceptically than those led by drummers and, it was with that prejudicial thought in mind that I wound up the Victrola (I'll have to get one of these newfangled Dansette things).

It seemed, after Fab's extended intro to Sam Jones' One For Amos, that I was right and that this album was going to be a bass player's dream and a nightmare for non aficionados of the lower frequencies. 

The James Harrison Playhouse Band @ Dormans Jazz Club, Middlesbrough - August 22


James Harrison (keys/accordion); Alice Grace (vocals); Will Howard (tenor sax/clarinet); Keith Peberdy (bass); Russ Morgan (drums).
(Review by Ron H)

Back in 2010, Tees Hot Club organised a jazz night at Dormans Club in Middlesbrough – they hoped it would catch on. Now, nine years on and approximately 450 sessions later, the general consensus of opinion is that it has ‘caught on’!

The audience that crowded the room for a special celebratory night certainly thought so as they were treated to a fantastic night of music and entertainment.

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Ushaw Jazz Festival - The Weekend in Pictures

Following on from the weekend's fantastic jazz festival at Ushaw College, I've created a photo album using pics from Malcolm Sinclair, Brian Ebbatson, Russell and myself and covering all 13 concerts.

Hopefully, this will serve as a memento of a weekend that was blessed by, not only glorious weather but jazz from across the board that, somehow, managed to please just about everyone.

The Tenement Jazz Band @ The Jazz Bar (Edinburgh Fringe Festival) - August 26


John Youngs (banjo, guitar, vocals); Charles Dearness (trumpet); Paddy Darley (trombone); Tom Pickles (soprano sax, alto sax); Doug Kemp (string bass)   
(Review by Russell)

Fully half an hour before the five thirty start the queue snaked up Chambers Street - and that was the queue for lucky ticket holders, those walking up on the day formed a secondary queue with no guarantee of getting in. Yes, the Tenement Jazz Band's final gig at this year's Edinburgh Fringe Festival was one of 2019's hot tickets.

Seven Tenement Jazz Band Fringe gigs down with one to go, Jazz Bar staff set out additional seating to meet the expected demand and, sure enough, as the five piece outfit stomped-off with At a Georgia Camp Meeting, the Chambers Street venue was thinking about turning away latecomers. John Youngs (banjo, guitar) did the talking for the Edinburgh based outfit, often seeking clarification on matters pertaining to recording dates, personnel and the like from band mates, in particular the band's early jazz historian, trombonist Paddy Darley.

JazzMain: Diggin Dexter! @ The Jazz Bar (Edinburgh Fringe Festival) - August 26

Nick Gould (tenor sax); Steve Grossart (piano); Iain Harkness (double bass); Kevin Dorrian (drums) 
(Review by Russell)

South of the border it was a public holiday, in Scotland's capital city it was just another work day Monday. Edinburgh's countless tourists were enjoying/enduring sweltering temperatures while down a flight of stairs on Chambers Street the basement Jazz Bar offered some relief from the burning sun. On this, the final day of this year's Fringe Festival, Nick Gould brought in JazzMain to play a mid-afternoon Dexter Gordon set. 

No time to lose at a Fringe gig - one hour, hit the ground running and, as Gordon himself would have said...Go! Straight in with Sticky Wicket. Steve Grossart at the Jazz Bar's Yamaha piano put down a marker on You Stepped Out of a Dream with bassist Iain Harkness stepping up and Kevin Dorrian covering everything behind the traps as JazzMain's main man, tenor saxophonist Nick Gould, took on the challenge of doing justice to the music of the quartet's subject, the legendary Dexter Gordon. 

Monday, August 26, 2019

Comparing the Lyrics of 2 Songs: You Took Advantage Of Me And How Insensitive

(By Ann Alex)

Another in my occasional writings about song lyrics, a special interest of mine. At Blue Jazz Voices last term we were presented with both these songs, and on seeing the titles I thought 'Yes' these will both be dramatic songs about lost love. However only How Insensitive is actually such a song, in which the singer expresses anguish that she/he didn't realise how hurtful their reactions to the lover were and has regrets. 

Ushaw Jazz Festival (Day Three, Evening) Buck Clayton Legacy Band - August 26

Matthias Seuffert (tenor sax); Robert Fowler (alto sax); Menno Daams (trumpet); Ian Smith (trumpet); Adrian Fry (trombone/arranger); Martin Litton (piano); Alyn Shipton (double bass); Clark Tracey (drums).
(Review by Lance).

The jewel in the crown of the Ushaw Jazz Festival 2019  or so  
we all thought. Up to now audiences had been reasonable in numbers so surely this would be the one where they'd be turning people away.

It wasn't. Had they all gone to Headingley? Had the heatwave drawn them to the seaside or had those who were knocked out by Xhosa Cole and Francis Tulip migrated to their gig held in Newcastle?

Answers are needed.

Ushaw Jazz Festival (Day 3, Afternoon Part Two) John Pope Quintet - August 25

John Pope (double bass); Graham Hardy (trumpet/flugelhorn); Faye MacCalman (tenor sax/clarinet); Chris Biscoe (alto/baritone sax); Johnny Hunter (drums).
(Review by Lance)

The opening free form blast made my hair stand on end and I prepared to jump out of the open window (ground floor!) then, suddenly, it morphed into a swingy ensemble that could have been Mingus - I moved back from the window. Which was a good thing as it turned out to be a great couple of sets. Sure, one or two ot the solos approached the edge of my comfort zone but not many and the overall feeling was good.

It had been many years since I'd heard Chris Biscoe and, like Tony Kofi the night before, never on baritone. Chris is one of the relatively unsung heroes of British jazz slotting into whatever genre at both ends of the spectrum. Impressed. Chris was doing for jazz what, simultaneously, Ben Stokes (second innings) was doing for English cricket and Newcastle for northeast football (Spurs 0-Newcastle 1).

Ushaw Jazz Festival (Day 3 Afternoon Part One) VHB - August 25

Faye Thompson (alto sax); Marko Marsenic (tenor sax); Cameron McArthur (piano/keys); Rebecca Hall (synth bass); Susan Rutter (drums).
(Review by Lance)

After the previous day's invasion by the Birmingham gang, today it was the turn of a contingent from York University to take root in the Francis Thompson Room.

Led from piano/keys by McArthur, the music was very Robert Glasper inspired which is the Holy Grail to some and the devil incarnate to others (note how I pick my metaphors to suit the surrounds). Personally, my feelings lie somewhere in the middle and, all in all, it was an enjoyable set.

Ushaw Jazz Festival: Zoë Gilby Family Jazz All Stars - August 25


Zoë Gilby (vocals); Mark Williams (guitar); Andy Champion (double bass); Richard Brown (drums)
(Review by Russell)

A bank holiday weekend with, for once, glorious sunshine all the way. Where to take the kids? Shopping? The seaside? Nope, a sprawling country estate, that's where! No cries of: I'm bored! Can we go? Not when jazz means prizes!

Zoë Gilby's Family Jazz All Stars set up in the Francis Thompson Room at Ushaw College. Daddy...who was Francis Thompson? Er...I don't know, sit and listen to the jazz. Jazz? But I don't like...Listen, you could win a prize...

Sunday, August 25, 2019

Ushaw Jazz Festival: Late night jam session - August 24

(Review by Russell)

It was another run of the mill jam session as three familiar faces - Messrs Edis, Grainger and Morgan - kicked things off with I'm Old Fashioned followed by Blame it on My Youth (pianist Paul Edis singing on both of them). This was to be anything but yer usual drop-by-and-have-a-blow affair.

At the end of a long day the house trio wasted no time inviting the first of the sitters-in to have a blow. This was the late night knockings of day two at the 2019 Ushaw Jazz Festival with an A-list cast queueing up at the bar. First to join the party was Birmingham Conservatoire undergraduate pianist Will Markham who wanted to take a look at Stella by Starlight. From here on in, 'til gone midnight, it was a bewildering roster of A -listers tackling the likes of It Could Happen to You and If I Should Lose You.

Tony Kofi & The Organisation @ Ushaw Jazz Festival (Evening Day 2, Part 1) - August 24

Tony Kofi (baritone sax); Simon Fernsby (guitar); Pete Whitaker (organ); Pete Cater (drums)

Hit the deck running was the phrase that jumped into my head as Kofi blasted out the opening four bars of Minor League. This was powerhouse stuff as the smart-suited Kofi roared off down that well known street - the one with 12 bars in it. Not only does he play better than most but he also cuts it on the sartorial front.

I thought that I'd never hear better baritone playing again in my life but it turned out to be only until the next number - Bossallegro! And so it went on. This was hard bop meets R 'n' B in a former catholic seminary in County Durham.

Xhosa Cole-Francis Tulip Quintet, Matt Anderson & Paul Edis @ Ushaw Jazz Festival (Afternoon Day 2, Part 2) - August 24

Xhosa Cole (tenor sax); Francis Tulip (guitar); Will Markham (piano); Shivraj Singh (double bass); Kai Chareunsy (drums).
(Review/photo by Lance).

The boys from Birmingham were on stage or, to be more precise, were in front of the stage. The second city's conservatoire is renowned for the amazingly high level of young jazz musicians it produces and these five young guys are the perfect example. Francis Tulip we know well from his gigs with his own band the Francis Tulip Quartet who, only a week ago, set the pulses racing in a Jazz Coop session with Dan Garel at the Globe. 

Jo Harrop, Nathan Lawson @ Ushaw Jazz Festival Day 2 (afternoon part one) -

Jo Harrop (vocals); Paul Edis (piano); Andy Champion (bass); Russ Morgan (drums) + Matt Anderson (tenor sax).
(Review by Lance).

Day 2 of the Ushaw Jazz Festival began with one of our favourite singers, Jo Harrop, who presented a programme that could have been subtitled Jo Harrop Sings Paul Edis as, apart from pieces by Walter Donaldson, Frank Loesser, Billie Holiday, Richard Rodgers and Leonard Bernstein, as well as Brook Bowman's East of the Sun featuring a guest appearance by Matt Anderson, Jo's remaining numbers were all words and music by Edis. 

Not that I'm complaining! They're fine contemporary tunes with lyrics that have meaning. Plus, Jo was in good voice and looked stunning in an ankle length gown and  killer heels.

A fine start to the afternoon.

Saturday, August 24, 2019

Emma Fisk's Hot Club du Nord & Early Bird Big Band @ Ushaw Jazz Festival - August 23

Emma Fisk (violin); James Birkett, Dave Harris (guitars); Bruce Rollo (bass)
(Review by Lance)

With some musicians their instrument is the equivalent of the doctor's stethoscope or the plumber's wrench - the tools of their trade. However, there are other musicians - a select few - who are totally at one with their instrument. It isn't something they take out of a case and then put it back again a couple of hours later. It is part of them - an extension - just as much so as any of their vital organs.

Emma Fisk is such a person. Even when her violin is safely tucked up in its case you feel it is still a part of her. At least that's my impression having listened to her twice in the course of a week.

Friday, August 23, 2019

CD Review: Ahmad Jamal - Ballades

Ahmad Jamal (piano) + James Cammack (double bass on 3 tracks)
(Review by Lance)

I have to admit that when I first heard Jamal - over 50 years ago - I wasn't immediately enamoured of his playing. There seemed to be too many spaces in contrast to what Peterson and Garner were doing back then. However, with the passage of time, I now see that his minimalism gave credence to the less is more school and he is deserving of his high standing among the pantheon of jazz's all-time greats.

Thursday, August 22, 2019

BBC Proms 45 – Mississippi Goddam: A homage to Nina Simone @ Royal Albert Hall - August 21

Metropole Orkest conducted by Jules Buckley; Lisa Fischer, Ledisi  (vocals); LaSharVu (backing vocals)
(Review by Leah Williams.)

A homage to Nina Simone – where do you even start? From young piano virtuoso to civil rights activist to ‘The High Priestess of Soul’, Nina Simone is a figure whose talent, raw life experience and unflinching determination has given her an appeal that crosses the boundaries of geography, race and time.

From the opening notes of the instrumental medley of African Mailman and Sinnerman, it was clear that Nina’s distinct style and infectious rhythms would be given their due. The Netherlands-based Metropole Orkest is a symphony orchestra with an integrated big band who play across the jazz, pop, world and film music genres. It’s immediately obvious that they are the right musicians for the job and, under the baton of Brit Jules Buckley, their mastery of and enthusiasm for the excellent arrangements of Simone’s songs was quite outstanding. From lush strings to unique rhythms to solo improvisations, every musician contributed to capturing the jaunty, sultry and severe edges of her music.

Sept. Programme (and change of day) @ Spice of Life


On those periodic occasions when I travel down to London for a few days my first priority is to ensure that my schedule allows me to be free to visit the Spice of Life on a Wednesday lunchtime where you can hear some of the best lunchtime jazz in the UK and, on occasion, maybe even the world!

Apart from the jazz, the beer's acceptable, the food looks tempting and it's always good to chat with David Burr who organises the gigs.

However, as of September 2 the sessions move from Wednesdays to Mondays but, as can be seen from the programme below, nothing else changes ...

Sunday Jazz in Middlesbrough


(Press release)

Following the success of the Middlesbrough Jazz Weekender in October 2018- the first major jazz event in the town for forty years- we are now proud to announce that the Town Hall will host a monthly Middlesbrough Sunday Jazz event- featuring multiple bands in one afternoon across different styles of jazz- but always with the emphasis on entertainment and variety.

Click here to see our Jazz brochure (hard copies are available upon request) ;

The monthly series kicks off on Sunday, September 22 with performances by the Noel Dennis Trio, Emma Johnson’s Gravy Boat and Anthony Strong.

Middlesbrough Sunday Jazz will showcase the best jazz talent from the North East and across the UK, from soloists like pianist Gwilym Simcock to large scale line-ups like the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra.

CD Review: Tini Thomsen’s MaxSax – Shift


Tini Thomsen (baritone saxophone); Nigel Hitchcock (alto saxophone); Tom Trapp (guitar); Mark Haanstra (bass); Joost Kroon (drums) with guest Miles Bould (percussion).
(Review by Hugh C)

Tini Thomsen originally hails from Hamburg but more recently has been based in Amsterdam.  Shift is the third album released by MaxSax.  King of Diamonds sets the tone and hits the listener straight away with high energy performance over a driving rock-style beat from Kroon’s powerhouse drumming.  Shift features more of Hitchcock’s alto, but maintains the rhythmic drive of the opening track.  The Gospel Tune has a slower, more laid back (well, gospel) feel with interesting interplay between both the saxes and Trapp’s guitar.  Little Lily’s Shoe brings us back to driving four time.

CD Review: Rob Ryndak, Tom Lockwood - Gratitude (featuring Brian Lynch).

Rob Ryndak (piano/percussion); Tom Lockwood (saxes/clarinets/flute); Brian Lynch (trumpet/flugelhorn); Sasha Brusin (electric/acoustic guitars); Karl E.H. Seigfried (bass/bass guitar); Jeff Moehle (drums); Victor Gonzalez, Jr. (various percussion); Micah Rutschman (vibes); Ryan Koranda (cello); Steve Talaga (piano).
(Review by Lance).

Such is the avalanche of CDs I receive that some get overlooked for all the wrong reasons! Sometimes I just don't like the cover, or there are too many names to type. Often the liner notes are difficult to read or maybe the musicians are unfamiliar to me and I have a more promising album waiting in the wings. I usually  make a resolution to check it out tomorrow which, as we all know, never comes.

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

A Night @ the Black Swan Jam Session - August 20

(Review/photos by Lance).

It looked to be a typical midsummer (this is summer?) evening with many of the regulars heading off to sunnier climes. The prospect appeared to be  a generally low key jam session which of course it never turns out to be.

The house trio - guitar, bass and drums - took us tastefully through There Will Never be Another You, Alone Together and Stella By Starlight. Staple jam session fayre.

The audience came in two by two and most of them were carrying instrument cases; it was like a gangster's convention in 1920's Chicago.

CD Review: Rebecca Nash – Peaceful King


Nicholas Malcolm (trumpet); Thomas Seminar Ford (guitar, electronics), Rebecca Nash (piano, keyboards); Chris Mapp (bass, electronics); Matt Fisher (drums); Sara Colman (vocals); Nick Walters (electronics)
(Review by Hugh C)

Peaceful King is Rebecca Nash’s first release as leader, along with her band, Atlas.  She is joined in her long-time collaboration with Malcolm, Ford, Mapp and Fisher by vocalist Sara Colman.  

Peaceful King slowly appears out of the ether with atmospheric electronics by Nick Walters.  A groove is established on drums and bass and Nicholas Malcolm’s rich trumpet sound adds icing to the cake. The track has a positivity which is stated to be “a reaction to the current state of the world” - we certainly need some of that!  

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Joe Reid: Postgraduate Recital @ The Music Studios, Newcastle University - August 20

Joe Reid (drums) + Neil Graham (guitar, vocals); Josh Fascia (bass guitar); Steve Grant (keyboards, vocals); Liam Mulpetre (guitar); Alex Brand (bass guitar)
(Review by Russell)

Earlier this year BSH caught drummer Joe Reid in action, first at the Dun Cow with the Bold Big Band and subsequently at his interim postgrad recital in Newcastle University's purpose-built Music Studios. On this late summer day Reid was about to undertake his final recital before  heading out into the scary world of hustling for gigs hoping to bag a seat on a globetrotting tour bus. 

Will Earl: Postgraduate Recital @ The Music Studios, Newcastle University - August 20

Will Earl (drums) + Liam Mulpetre (guitar); Alex Brand (bass guitar); Grace Alexander (keyboards)

(Review by Russell)

Solo and Groove: Innovation in Contemporary Drumming Practices - that was William 'Will' Earl's chosen programme for his postgraduate recital. Following six years of study this was to be the Newcastle University music student's final performance. The Band Room in the subterranean depths of the Music Studios on Assembly Lane filled with family, fellow students and other interested parties as Earl's High Noon appointment drew ever closer.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Eales broadcasts to the nation...

Inveterate jazz gig-goer and sometime BSH correspondent Tony Eales has been spreading the word about this weekend's Ushaw Jazz Festival. Thanks to a network of jazz friends, arrangements were made for TE to be interviewed by Tom Stevens, host of Siren Radio's weekly jazz programme. Tune in tomorrow morning to Simply Jazz (Tuesday, 12 noon - 2:00pm) to hear Our Man in County Durham chatting to Stevens about the big weekend at Ushaw and Eales' wider jazz interests. 

Siren Radio is Lincolnshire's community radio station based at the University of Lincoln broadcasting on 107.3 FM and online at www.sirenonline.co.ukSimply Jazz will be repeated on Sunday (Aug 25) at 11:00am. 
Russell

Six of the Best! The Trios of Giles Strong and Bradley Johnston @ Blaydon Jazz Club - August 18


(Review/photos by Roly)
Something a bit different at Blaydon last night. Two excellent trios playing one set each.
First up was the Giles Strong Trio - Giles Strong (guitar); Ian Paterson (double bass); Dean Stockdale (piano). Some tasty playing as you might expect from Giles, whose boppish playing also reflects the influence of greats such as Wes, Joe Pass and Jim Hall but with also a nod to the light rhythm playing of Herb Ellis in the Oscar Peterson Trio.

Dan Garel & Friends @ the Globe Jazz Bar - August 18

Dan Garel (alto); Francis Tulip (guitar); John Pope (bass guitar); Matt MacKellar (drums).
(Review by Lance).

I'd heard Garel many times during his tenure at Durham University - usually at the various jam sessions around town - and I was duly impressed. However, this was the first time I'd heard him in situ where he was calling the shots and, to put it mildly, I was doubly duly impressed! Surround him with three other guys of equal stature and the end product is one that is more magical than anything out of Harry Potter - maybe even Chris Potter! 

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Newcastle Jazz Festival @ Tyne Bank Brewery - August 17

(Review by Lance/Photos of musicians courtesy of Malcolm Sinclair - LINK).

A Newcastle Jazz Festival - what's not to like? I'm fortunate, or maybe unfortunate, to be old enough to remember the fantastic festivals organised by my dear friend Andy Hudson where Art Pepper, George Melly, Barney Kessel and many others graced the then University Theatre. Those were indeed halcyon days but, to compare today's festival with those that took place  back then - as has been done elsewhere - defeats the object entirely.

Although without the clout of previous big name sponsors it could, nevertheless,  be argued that on a pound for pound basis this matched any festival - either side of the river.

Friday, August 16, 2019

CD Review: Pigfoot - Pigfoot Shuffle

Chris Batchelor (trumpet/cornet); James Allsopp (baritone sax/bass clarinet); Liam Noble (piano/keys); Paul Clarvis (drums)
(Review by Lance).

Well! This one came out of left field. I put it on blindfold and what did I hear? Bubber Miley blowing Heartbreak Hotel! Of course it wasn't actually Bubber - dead many a long year - but his spirit had certainly taken over Batchelor's mindset. The trumpet (or was it cornet?) growled like as though that infamous rooming house had moved from Lonely St. to Duke's Place or maybe a joint in New Orleans where Allsopp was 'walkin' the bar' blowing bari for the strippers. This was 'bump and grind' music - so much so, I could only type in time to the rhythm!

Dan Garel Quartet @ Holy GrAle, Durham - August 15


Dan Garel (alto sax); Mark Williams (guitar); John Pope (bass guitar); Russ Morgan (drums)
(Review by Russell)

It was billed as the 'Daniel Garel Quartet' but as it was a Thursday not a Sunday the 'Dan Garel Quartet' seemed like a better fit. Twelve months on from graduating Dan returned to Durham to meet up with old buddies Mark Williams, John Pope and Russ Morgan to play two sets in Holy GrAle on Crossgate.

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Dave Rae's Levee Ramblers New Orleans Jazz Band with Ian Wynne @ Springwell Village Community Venue - August 14


Dave Rae (banjo, vocals); Mick Hill (cornet, vocals); Liz Bacon (clarinet); Jim Blenkin (trombone, vocals); Ian Wynne (piano); John Robinson (double bass); Paul Bacon (drums)
(Review by Russell)

All the Girls Go Crazy - don't know 'bout that but in its own way Wednesday's New Orleans jazz session in Springwell Village stirred more than a few with an all-too-rare appearance by Ian Wynne. Sitting at the upright our unassuming pianist opted for being one of the guys rather than hog the limelight as Dave Rae sang the opening number. 

In addition to leading the frontline, Mick Hill sang two or three numbers - Put on Your Old Grey BonnetBasin Street Blues and When You and I Were Young, Maggie - as well as playing some half decent N'awlins' cornet. Fellow brass man Jim Blenkin knew the melodies inside out and chipped in with a vocal or two, Harry Warren's Crying for the Carolines particularly effective. From time to time, clarinetist Liz Bacon glanced over her left shoulder to acknowledge pianist Wynne's sterling contribution.

Body and Soul @ Dormans Jazz Club,Middlesbrough - August 1

Richie Emmerson (tenor sax); Kevin Eland (trumpet/flugelhorn);Rick Laughlin (keys/synthesizer);  Keith Peberdy (bass); Stuie Ellerton (drums).
(Review by Ron H)

A good sized and enthusiastic audience turned out for this month’s guest band Body and Soul - a band with a reputation for playing exciting jazz.

Cantaloupe Island set the standard followed by a swinging Speak Low with impressive solos all round.

Tadd Dameron's Good Bait had a relaxed feel with Rick, Kevin and Richie in top form.

CD Review: Quentin Collins - Road Warrior

Quentin Collins (trumpet/flugelhorn); Meilana Gillard (alto sax); Leo Richardson (tenor sax); Dan Nimmer (piano/Rhodes on track 4); Joe Sanders (bass); Willie Jones III (drums) + Jean Toussaint (tenor sax - 2 tracks).
(Review by Lance).

They don't come any better than this! It's Jazz Messenger territory but these jazz posties aren't walkin' the streets they're running, they're flying - this isn't snail mail it's superfast broadband and what a band!

I've only just recovered from hearing Leo Richardson live at Pizza last week and here he is again but who's complaining? Not me that's for sure.

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Yorkshire village takes on traditional jazz clubs at national awards

(Press release)

A West Yorkshire village will take on traditional jazz clubs for the title of ‘venue of the year’ at a national jazz awards ceremony later this year.

Marsden Jazz Festival has made it through to the final of the prestigious Parliamentary Jazz Awards in London and has been shortlisted in the venue of the year category alongside jazz clubs in Bristol, Dorking and Brighton.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance