Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Dave Puddy: "Eventually we paid our entrance money [to Eel Pie Island] and fought our way to one of the many bars where we could buy our Newcastle Brown and retire to the back of the heaving dancefloor. There must have been lights somewhere, but my memory remains of being in some dark cavernous wonderland." - (Just Jazz July 2020)

Dave Rempis:Ten years from now, I can see musicians streaming concerts in real time and charging a minimal amount for people to watch.” - (DownBeat September 2013)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

Postage

11,618 (and counting) posts since we started blogging just over 12 years ago. 753 of them this year alone and, so far, 17 this month (July 5).

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

The Family Band @ Jazz Café - March 17

Riley Stone-Lonergan (tenor sax); Kim Macari (trumpet); Tom Rivière (bass); Steve Hanley (drums).
(Review/Photos courtesy of Ken Drew). 
First off, a composition by Macari, about a scorpion. Starting with a brief intro by herself, then an extended sax solo from Stone-Lonergan. 
A very lively opener. Then to a composition by Rivière, introduced by solo bass (bowed) with wind-sounding 'noises off' from the sax. 
A long section sees sax with trumpet - Stone-Lonergan solos melodically while trumpeter Macari utilises the distinct sound of her instrument to move between the tenor with counter phrasing and other less harmonic effects too.  Quite a slow and soulful tune - until they all let it rip for a short while, then ending quietly. Quite dramatic!  Then the pace picked up with all four, straight in with a well-paced number, the sax featuring here.  Blistering! And so refreshing!!   Closing the first set, a standard - I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You - lovely interplay, bluesy-soulful sax, with trumpet complementing in wonderful harmony, a superbly slow groove.  This piece would be perfect for a Sunny Sunday Jazz Festival, but for now a delightful end to the first set.
The interval arrived much too early – but time to briefly reflect. So far I'm thinking 'what a refreshing sound - lively and full of feeling with a good range of dynamics, pace and more importantly, feeling’. This bodes well for the second set. 
The Raffle dispensed with, Set 2, kicks off with a composition by Riley - fast & furious, full of energy along with smiles of enjoyment and appreciation across the band as they dig in and enjoy the moment together.  Then another of Rivière's compositions, for Steve Lacy, with an extended introduction from the trumpet followed by a lively bass riff playing underneath throughout, giving it a great driving force.

This was followed by a brief piece, also by Rivière, based on the thought of peace movements (and peace museums) around the world.  This piece being around the thoughts of lead balloons (atomic bombs) but seen through the eyes of survivors as they witness evening sunsets after the event.  A very sombre but thoughtful piece, with just trumpet and percussion. Then follows Manic Impression written by Macari during a recent visit to A&E tending to a broken ankle, which explains her rested foot during the performance. A fine piece, truly Manic, and well played by the band. Despite the context of the composition, it was so lively it could easily put a spring in your step!

Finally, their farewell piece A Poem for You with an extended improvised bass introduction augmented by sympathetic brass and moody percussion. The distinctly mournful horn melody is played over a rumbling bass. Then, slowly, the ensemble break in to a very energetic round of free improvisation.  A rousing piece, with more than just a hint of many of the greats in jazz who'd brought us this far, but the Family Band rolled it all up and took it further. 

In all, a performance of modern and exciting jazz, with more than just a hint of jazz from the 50's, but giving a strong sense of being totally up to date with a combination of scored tunes/themes and wonderfully improvised parts across a superb quartet.  The real standout of the evening was the band itself, the soloists were equal masters. Hanley on drums - excellent as ever following every twist and turn.  Macari on trumpet, despite being chair-bound (i.e. sitting throughout, so as to rest her broken ankle) she gave a superb performance both with solo spots and alongside the others. Stone-Lonergan, simply put, displayed some blistering sax work. Rivière also demonstrating fine solo parts as well as firm support for all pieces throughout.  Very powerful playing from each band member, but the sum of the parts being even greater. 
Overall, one of the best modern jazz groups performing at the moment. They played Manchester Jazz Festival last year, so we could surely expect to see them at Gateshead (GIJF) next year - either on the concourse or in Sage 2.  Why not?
Ken Drew

A co-promotion by Jazz North East and the Jazz Café.

No comments :

Blog Archive