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Bebop Spoken There

Bob Dawbarn (review of Joe Harriott's LP 'Free Form'): "Both horns scream and roar away, Keane at times doing a pretty fair imitation of an elephant angry with its keeper." - (Melody Maker, December 16, 1961).

Steve Race: "The non-musician critic knows how music ought to sound. But he cannot possibly know how it feels to create it. He is in the position of the marriage guidance counsellor who has never been married." – (Jazz News, June 6th 1962).

Archives.

Today Thursday July 27

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.
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Tyne Valley Jazzmen - No 1 Champagne Bar, 1 Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL4 7 NJ 12:30pm. Free.
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Evening.
Strictly Smokin' Big Band - The Millstone, Haddricks Mill Rd., South Gosforth NE3 3DB. 7pm. Cancelled for pub refurbishment. Back August 31.
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Alter Ego - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8pm. £5.
Jo Harrop & Paul Edis - The Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm
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Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE, 8:30pm. Free.
Ray Johnson & Richard Herdman - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling St., Gateshead NE2 2BA. 8pm. Free.
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Paul Skerritt Band - The Pennyweight, Bakehouse Hill, Darlington DL1 5QA. 9pm. Free.
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Tees Hot Club w. Kevin Eland (tpt); Donna Hewitt (alto); Graham Thompson (keys); Mark Hawkins (drums) - Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Free. 9pm.
Pocket Jazz Orchestra "Jazz & Tapas" - No 60, Arc, Dovecote St., Stockton TS18 1LL 7pm. £10.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

As I was saying about Bob Dylan....

(By JC)
While there has been some debate about whether Bob Dylan should feature on BSH it should be noted that, following his two earlier GAS book recordings, he has now released another 30 songs on a 3-CD album called Triplicate. As this has just been released I have not heard it yet but it's on my list (at the moment I am still working my way through last year's release of a 36-CD box set of every concert on Dylan's infamous 1966 world tour!). However, I have read an interview he gave to Bill Flanagan to coincide with the release of Triplicate in which he talks in a very interesting way about why the songs are important to him and why he wants to record them.

He talks about meeting Sinatra and what songs he liked and also what jazz musicians he likes and draws on - Tommy Dorsey, Gene Krupa, Elvin Jones, Artie Shaw and Fats Waller. He also mentions seeing Coltrane at the Village Gate and how Ornette Coleman and himself would go to each other's concerts. When asked about what he listens to late at night Dylan mentions Sarah Vaughan's My Kinda Love and the album she did with Clifford Brown. And I've left out all the references to the folk tradition, blues and rock and roll. Whatever people think of him this is a guy who really listens to other people's music.
For his last question the interviewer asks:

'- From the 20s into the early 50s, the line between blues and pop and country and jazz was very flexible. Robert Johnson, Jimmie Rodgers, Bing Crosby, Ray Charles all tried their hand at everything. Why do fences come up between different styles of American music?'

'- Because of the pressure to conform.'

The interview can be found on Bob Dylan's website - http://bobdylan.com/news/qa-with-bill-flanagan/

JC

1 comment :

  1. I don't think it was that Bob shouldn't be on a jazz site, especially doing versions of the great American songbook, but concern that it had the most hits.
    There's been a discussion this very day whether progressive rock should feature and, while I can't believe I'm agreeing with Steve T, there are far greater parallels between jazz and progressive rock than jazz and Bob, even Bob doing great American songbook.
    Incidentally, Robert Johnson made less than thirty records, all fairly straightforward country blues.
    Bing was a crooner - always and as far as I can tell Jimmie Rodgers made country and western. Ray Charles was a jack of all trades, master of none. As a soul singer he was no James Brown, as a blues artist he was no Muddy, as a rock and roller he was no Elvis, as a jazz artist he was no Miles, as a crooner he was no Sinatra. He may have been good at c+w, I've no idea. Better than Johnny Cash I'll bet. Oops, another sacred nut-roast.

    ReplyDelete

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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