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Bebop Spoken There

Billy Cobham: "Miles said to us, 'Don't play in between takes,' so of course John [McLaughlin] played in between takes." - (JazzTimes, Nov. 2019).

Archive

Today Thursday November 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Road, Holystone NE27 0DA. Tel: 0191 266 6173. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jazz

Brand New Heavies - Riverside, Neptune House, Close, Newcastle NE1 3RQ. 7:00pm. £25.00.

Alice Grace-Jordan Alfonso Quintet - St James' & St Basil's Church, Fenham Hall Drive, Fenham, Newcastle NE4 9EJ. 7:30pm. £8.00. (£4.00. student).

Son Yambu - Whorlton Village Hall, Barnard Castle DL12 8XD. Tel: 01833 627253. 7:30pm. £10.00., £5.00. child, £25.00. family.

Maine Street Jazzmen - Sunniside Social Club, Hollywell Lane, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5NJ. Tel: 0191 488 7347. 8:30pm. Free.

Tees Hot Club w. Dan Johnson (tenor sax); Donna Hewitt (slto sax); Dave Archbold (keys). - Dorman’s Club, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Tel: 01642 823813. 8:30pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees TS18 4AW. 8:30pm. £2.50.

Blues/Soul/Funk/Etc.

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Scarborough Jazz Festival 2019. Sunday, September 22. Afternoon Session: Alec Dankworth's Spanish Accents and Bonsai.

Alec Dankworth's Spanish Accents:
Graciela Rodriquez (vocal), Jesus Olmedo (dance), Roland Sutherland (flute), Mark Lockheart (saxes), Phil Robson (guitar), Alec Danworth (double bass), Demi Garcia Sabat (drums).
(Review/photos by Steve T).

Dog-sitter problems meant we had to forfeit the first band of the session but arrived just in time for this impressive lineup. The thought of some sketches of Spain and Tijuana moods was mouth-watering but also presented problems of translation, comprehension and no doubt spelling, so apologies in advance for going with his translations.

The first piece translated as In Your Latte and brought the first of many fine solos from flautist Roland Sutherland. The instrument is still a relative rarity in jazz which always keep them interesting.

The second piece was Drinking Water and introduced featured vocalist Graciela Rodriquez and brought the first solo from Phil Robson, demonstrating why he's one of the country's leading jazz guitarists. The choice of guitar over piano seemed appropriate and proved to be a masterstroke. 

Rodriquez upped the ante for the first of two pieces from Cuban album and film the Buena Vista Social Club, giving a more deep-throated and impassioned performance.

Dankworth announced Oye Como Va as a piece made famous by its creator Tito Puente, though Santana probably made it far more famous. This stuck with the original, but with lyrics in English.

Two original instrumentals were followed by a Spanish folk song translated as Four Wheel Drive, featuring an unsuccessful attempt to replicate the sound of bagpipes - apparently commonplace in Spanish music - with a flute. Once it got going, it reminded me of an early Jethro Tull song called Fatman, with some great flute, the drummer playing with his hands and dancer Olmedo adding castanets.

The announcement of the final piece as Sudusa by Abdullah Ibrahim met with approval from the audience and proved the high point of the set for me, the leader conceding it's more African than Spanish, though there do seem to be many historic links between Spain and Africa, just across the Med.

Bonsai
Rory Ingham (trombone), Dominic Ingham (violin, vocal), Toby Comeau (keyboards), Joe Lee (bass guitar), Jonny Mansfield (drums).

Just time for a quick latte while listening to northeast guitarist James Birkett and his trio, with guests on keyboards, harmonica and an assortment of singers, before it was back in for the next band, only to find it had changed from the original programme.
      
They'd been scheduled to open the day's session but had presumably swapped with the New Jazz Extempore, who were due to close the afternoon session.

I was intrigued by the unusual frontline of trombone and violin and it worked a treat. Compere Alan Barnes described them as a cracking little band and - for once - he wasn't joking.

Hop and the Hip Replacement found the trombone embellished with effects while the violin played it straight, and the set was at its best when both frontline instruments played.

Dominic handled most of the vocals and was fine rather than remarkable, though struggled outside his range. A bit folky, a bit proggy, one small moan would be that there was too much singing and I liked it better when he was playing violin.

A number of people began to drift away, though I suspect more to extend the break before the next session than as a reflection of the band, but we took the opportunity to move right to the front.

Once again the final piece was my favourite, this one called The Crescent. It featured several tempo changes, 'bone and violin in unison during the faster passages, intricate drumming, an into-it bass player and a keyboardist in the centre keeping it all together. 

An extended trombone solo increased the anticipation of a final violin showcase, but the tension was prolonged by a restrained bass solo, with light touch cymbals and keys before the 'bone came back in, Dominic scatting along before his violin joined the trombone ahead of his inevitable solo.

They'd have probably benefited from going on first or playing the previous set, but nevertheless did themselves proud.     
Steve T

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance