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Bebop Spoken There

Sting: "It was great. They [the River City Jazzmen] all wore blue suits. The band had been together for about twenty years, which was the same age as the suits." - (Melody Maker Sept. 22, 1979).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday October 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see centre column).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 3:00pm/5:30pm. Screening of Stanley Nelson's documentary film (2019, cert. 15, 1hr 55mins).

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

CD Review: Mark Sherman - My Other Voice.

Mark Sherman (piano); Vincent Herring(alto saxophone); Ray Drummond/Dan Chmielinski (bass); Nana Sakamoto (trombone); Carl Allen (drums).
(Review by James H)

Mark Sherman is best known as a percussionist and vibraphone player, having played vibes as a sideman to Peggy Lee and other big jazz names of the late 20th century, as well as classical percussion in orchestras conducted by Bernstein, Solti and the like.  He describes piano as “his other voice” hence the title of this new CD.  Piano may be Sherman’s other voice, but it is a bold and articulate voice in this eclectic collection of jazz standards, less well known tunes and his own compositions.   Mark teaches at The Juilliard School in New York and, on this album, he works with other established players on the New York scene as well as newcomers Nana Sakamoto on trombone and bassist Dan Chmielinski.

The album tends towards a hard bop feel, but also has its tender moments. The playing is tight and exciting, beginning with Sherman’s own composition Primative Reality, where Sherman’s piano has a driving McCoy Tyner-like quality, presaging confident solos by Herring and Sakamoto.  

Horace Silver’s Juicy Lucy follows, with a nice bluesy solo by Vincent Herring.  In John Lewis’ Milestones Sherman manages a Modern Jazz Quartet feel, and Nana Sakamoto’s excellent solo catches the spirit of the piece.  

Ale, a Mark Sherman tune, is hoppy and zesty with a nice head, just like good beer should be, helped down by interesting bass playing by Chmielinski.   The mood quietens down in Ev’rytime we Say Goodbye, the Cole Porter standard, in which the horns sit out and the trio (this time with Ray Drummond on bass) renders a tender ballad.  The driving feel returns with Cedar Walton’s Hindsight, and Sherman and Sakamoto’s solos keep the mood going.  

In Devotion’s Dance, another Sherman tune, we have an edgy, jerky waltz-like feel, with more talented bass playing by Chmielinski.   The disc finishes with The Cup Bearers, an old hard bop tune from the 1960s, with spirited solos from Herring and Sakamoto.

My Other Voice is an exciting and well crafted album, with tight ensemble playing and some inspired solo playing.   Of particular note is Nana Sakamoto’s fine, accurate trombone playing.  Sakamoto, only 24 years of age and recently arrived from Japan, is a newcomer to the New York scene and has a promising career ahead of her.

This CD grew on me over a few listenings.  It is an intelligent and well put together disc, which pays homage to hard bop and takes it to new places.  Piano may be Mark Sherman’s other voice, but it is a confident voice, which doesn’t disappoint.   
James H

Available on Miles High Records via usual suspects.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance