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Bebop Spoken There

Raymond Chandler: “ I was walking the floor and listening to Khatchaturian working in a tractor factory. He called it a violin concerto. I called it a loose fan belt and the hell with it ". The Long Goodbye, Penguin 1959.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST!

Holly Cooper, Mouthpiece Music: "Lance writes pull quotes like no one else!"

Simon Spillett: A lovely review from the dean of jazz bloggers, Lance Liddle...

Josh Weir: I love the writing on bebop spoken here... I think the work you are doing is amazing.

Postage

16350 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 16 years ago. 230 of them this year alone and, so far, 27 this month (April 11).

From This Moment On ...

April

Fri 12: Pete Tanton’s Chet Set @ The Old Library, Auckland Castle. 1:00pm. £8.00.
Fri 12: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm. Free.
Fri 12: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms. 1:00pm. Free.
Fri 12: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ The Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm. £5.00.
Fri 12: Katrina Miller Trio @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig.

Sat 13: Giles Strong Quartet @ Claypath Deli, Durham. 7:00-9:00pm. £10.00.
Sat 13: Phantom Bagman + Forgetmenots @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 7:30pm.£5.00. + bf. Upstairs.
Sat 13: Rockin’ Turner Brothers @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig. Downstairs.

Sun 14: Am Jam @ The Globe, Newcastle. 2:00pm. Free.
Sun 14: 4B @ The Ticket Office, Whitley Bay Metro Station. 3:00pm. Free.
Sun 14: Alan Law, Jude Murphy & Tim Johnston @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 7:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig.
Sun 14: JazzMain @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Mon 15: Dave Newton @ Yamaha Music School, Seaforth St., Blyth NE24 1AY. 1:00 - 1:45pm. £8.00. + bf. Newton, solo piano.
Mon 15: Harmony Brass @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm. Free.
Mon 15: Hideout @ Cluny 2, Newcastle. 7:00pm. £7.50 + £1.33 bf. Feat. Sleep Suppressor + Flat Moon.
Mon 15: Russ Morgan Quartet @ The Black Bull, Blaydon. 8:00pm. £8.00.

Tue 16: The Horne Section’s Hit Show @ Middlesbrough Town Hall. 7:30pm.
Tue 16: Jam session @ The Black Swan, Newcastle. 7:30pm. Free. House trio: Bradley Johnston, Paul Grainger, Bailey Rudd.

Wed 17: Bailey Rudd (Minor Recital) @ The Music Studios, Haymarket Lane, Newcastle University. 11:40am. Bailey Rudd (drums). Open to the public.
Wed 17: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm. Free.
Wed 17: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Social Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Free. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 17: The Horne Section’s Hit Show @ The Gala, Durham. 7:30pm. SOLD OUT!
Wed 17: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm. Free.

Thu 18: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, Whitley Road, North Tyneside. 1:00pm. Free.
Thu 18: NONUNONU @ Elder Beer Café, Chillingham Road, Newcastle. 7:30pm.
Thu 18: Knats @ Hoochie Coochie, Newcastle. 8:00pm (doors 7:30pm). £8.00. + bf. Support act TBC.
Thu 18: Merlin Roxby @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Free. A ‘Jar on the Bar’ gig. Ragtime piano.
Thu 18: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman’s Club, Middlesbrough. 8:30pm. Guest band night with Just Friends: Ian Bosworth (guitar); Donna Hewitt (sax); Dave Archbold (keys); Ron Smith (bass); Mark Hawkins (drums).

Thursday, September 26, 2019

CD Review: Playing the Room - Avishai Cohen, Yonathan Avishai


Avishai Cohen  (trumpet),  Yonathan Avishai   (piano)
(Review by Chris Kilsby)

The first of two outstanding ECM releases this month - both led by trumpet players - this one a duo with piano.  The horn here is that of New York based Israeli Avishai Cohen, not to be confused with the virtuoso bass player of the same name who has been on the scene rather longer.  This Avishai mostly follows a cool and detached jazz dialect here, by contrast to his compatriot namesake’s famously strong Middle Eastern groove. Until digesting this release, I had the trumpeter down as the lesser of the two Cohens, but now I’m not so sure, especially after the bass player’s recent lapse into popular vocals! 


The album is recorded with customary ECM clarity in the Auditorio Stelio Molo RSI in Lugano, resulting in, as claimed in the notes, a resonant, chamber music quality. It is an enthralling, relaxed and subtle statement across the thoughtful end of modern jazz, but built on material for the standards lovers to enjoy.   
Cohen deploys a remarkable range of technique and effects across a variety of material and styles. That’s not to say this is a show off “master class” – the album oozes musical integrity and taste, mostly through under-stated and winding melodic lines, with breathy or blasting interjections, and upper register pyrotechnics tastefully deployed where needed.  

My resident trumpet student was mighty impressed, raving over the echoes of Kenny Wheeler, muted Miles and more.   Such up front  technique and inclusion of so many covers raises the suspicion that Cohen is still looking for a voice of his own, but this is dispelled by the expressive and sensitive tracks here.

Only the first two tracks are originals, the rest being “original” interpretations of classics ranging in time from Duke Ellington to Ornette Coleman.  The first, Opening, by Cohen, sets the tone for the album with thoughtful and lyrical exchanges both solo and duo. Cohen plays sumptuous lines, with a distinctive modern edge, and wastes few notes.  The second, Two Lines, by the pianist, stretches further, with piercing trumpet anchored by complex and subtle harmony and pulse from piano – no drummer needed here!

For the remaining covers, in date order,  Azalea by Duke is lovingly caressed with muted horn and subtle block chords, while Coltrane’s Crescent is a spacious and even more languid rendition than the 1964 original, with soaring but sensitive top end.  The hornless MJQ’s modal 1955 Ralph’s New Blues finally gets a horn part, and both players seem to enjoy exchanging the lead and toying with time.  

Sir Duke is a departure from the other more or less conventional interpretations – this is a very stripped back and restrained version of Stevie Wonder’s jaunty full band and vocals 1976 tribute to Ellington. 

Abdullah Ibrahim’s Kofifi Blue is more upbeat, and a worthy version of the solo piano 1996 original. Here the trumpet sketches lyrically over restrained Cape style piano, and although the trumpet will take the plaudits for most listeners, Yonathan Avishai’s playing and soloing is sensitive and compelling throughout the album. Their long partnership reaches a rare level of intuition, with free soloing by both alongside conventional interlocking combinations and occasional precise doubling.

Ornette Coleman’s Dee Dee is given a more relaxed and sparse, but still engaging, treatment than the 2001 original. The album closes with my favourite,  Shir Eres, a delicate and exquisitely played traditional lullaby.

Overall, not a landmark due to the preponderance of covers, but a strongly recommended listen for students of trumpet (and piano!). Already a repeat listening favourite – the reflective and calm mood a good antidote for the strident chaos of recent weeks’ current affairs.
Touring all over Europe, but not in the UK as far as I can see. Seems in keeping with the times...

Chris K
Release date: 06.09.2019 ECM 2641 Format CD LP    Recorded September 2018

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