Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Remembering Tony Hall (1928-2019)

I feel a lot of sadness at the death of record producer/journalist and many other things, Tony Hall. aged 91.

Back in my teenage years when I lived in London for awhile most of my leisure time was spent hanging out at the 100 Club on Oxford St., or the Flamingo Club on Wardour St. It was at this latter venue which, in the days before Ronnie's, was the premier modern jazz club in London. All the top British names played there including the Jazz Couriers, Eddie Thompson (with his guide dog Max sleeping under the piano), Don Rendell and, on one memorable occasion, Carmen McRae with Don Abney on piano.

Tony Hall was the compere on most evenings, a role he carried out with authority and humour - as cool a dude as anyone on the scene at that time.

I remember an occasion when someone asked him who was playing at the club on the following night. He looked puzzled before saying, "Haven't got a clue - is there a Melody Maker in the house?"

Tony also produced and wrote the sleeve notes for the old Tempo label which featured many of the above names.

He later moved on to greater things but, for me, he'll always be the tall young man who made those Flamingo sessions so enjoyable.

Tony Hall passed away on June 26, 2019.
Sadly missed.
Lance.

7 comments :

Harry said...

Hi Lance,

Sorry to read of Tony Hall's passing. He was a shining light pushing local jazz and jazz musicians in those early days. I don't think there are many of us left who still remember the great sessions at The Flamingo and the 100 Club.

Best regards

Harry Monty

Lance said...

Yes, those were the days Harry - who knows, we may have been at the same gigs or had a pint at the pub opposite the Flamingo, or the one around the corner from the 100 Club! I'd love to hear more of your memories from those halcyon days.

Harry said...

Hi Lance,

Many a memorable night at the Flamingo with many of the top names appearing - some I can still remember are the Ronnie Scott nine piece, The Jazz Couriers with Ronnie and Tubby, The Johnny Dankworth Orchestra with Cleo Laine - spine tingling session, the Jazz Makers with Alan Ganley and Ronnie Ross, the Jazz Five with Vic Ash and Harry Klein, the Tony Kinsey group with Joe Harriott and of course, as you mentioned, Eddie Thompson and his dog Max. At the 100 Club one fantastic night was Humph and his band with Tony Coe and Joe Temperley and featuring Jimmy Rushing.
Another club I went on a couple of occasions was the Blue Lagoon which was in a basement in Carnaby Street (before it became famous). On the second occasion Helen Merrill was appearing with Dill Jones (I think), Spike Heatley and John Marshall, when who should come into the club but Dinah Washington with her pianist, Beryl Booker. Helen invited them up and Dinah then started to sing and literally brought the house down. What a night!!!

That's all for now.

Best regards

Harry

Lance said...

1959 - the Woody Herman Anglo-American Herd at the Royal Festival Hall. An all British sax section (apart from Woody).Johnny Scott, Don Rendell, Art Ellefson, Ronnie Ross. Trumpets: Bert Courtly, Les Condon, Kenny Wheeler + Nat Adderley Reunald Jones. Trombones: Eddie Harvey, Ken Wray + the great Bill Harris. An all-American rhythm section: Charlie Byrd (guitar), Vince Guaraldi (piano), Keeter Betts (bass), Jimmy Campbell (drums). the British guys (ok I know that 2 were Canadian) more than held their own.

I envy you seeing Helen Merrill and Dinah Washington on the same night!

Harry said...

Hi Lance,

Yes that was a triumph of collaboration between American,Canadian and British musicians - I don't think I saw them at the Royal Festival Hall but probably saw them at the Odeon Hammersmith. I understand it was Ronnie Ross who organised the British contingent. Great memories.

Best regards

Harry

Lance said...

That is amazing, I too thought I'd saw them at Hammersmith! However, I still have the programme and when I checked it was deffo RFH. The tour finished at the Granada cinemas in Tooting and Walthamstow. I did see JATP at Hammersmith.

Incidentally, the programme has an advert for the Marquee Club featuring all the usual suspects plus Michael Garrick. This was before it moved into blues and rock 'n' roll.

Cost 4 bob to get into the club - 5p in new money to see Tubby Hayes!

Lance said...

Whoops! Got my maths wrong - 20p, still a bargain at any price to hear Tubbs...

Blog Archive